The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins
Written and Illustrated by Dr. Seuss
1938
Ages 6-12
45 pages

Bartholomew Cubbins loves his read hat with a feather in it. It was a family heirloom, and Bartholomew thought it was the greatest hat in all of King Derwin’s Kingdom of Didd. One day Bartholomew was out in town, and King Derwin passed by. Bartholomew removed his cap, as was the custom of the day, but the oddest thing happened. Under his cap was another identical cap. Then another. Then another. When the king’s guards tried to take Bartholomew to the dungeon, the caps continued to multiply. If Bartholomew cannot manage to remove his hat, he will be excommunicated; or beheaded. Will he make it? Will the caps ever stop multiplying? - KD

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Very Bad Day
Judith Viorst
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: July 1987
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Alexander goes to sleep with gum in his mouth and wakes up with it in his hair. From there his day does not get much better his mom forgets to put a dessert in his lunch, and the dentist finds a cavity, when both his brother’s get clean check-ups! Throughout all of this Alexander proclaims that he is having a “terrible, horrible, no good very bad day”, and that he thinks that he is going to move to Australia! - AP

All By Myself
Mercer Mayer
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: March 2001
Copyright 1983
24 Pages
Ages: 4-8

Kids always want to be able to do things by themselves and sometimes this leads them to try to do things that they can’t or shouldn’t. Mercer Mayer does a good job describing all the things that this little guy can. Some of the things he can do well and some he is not so good at. Kids are proud to know what they can do and this story shows at the end that there are some things that they cannot do by themselves, like read a bedtime story! - JK

Alligator Sue
Sharon Arms Doucet; Illustrated by: Anne Wilsdorf
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Pub. Date: August 2003
Age Range: 5 to 8
40pp

Sue lives deep in a Louisiana swamp with her parents and she loves to sing along to the song they play, but one day a hurricane comes through, picks Sue up and drops her off right in front of a momma alligator. Luckily for Sue the Momma Alligator takes her as one of her own and raises her like the rest of here children. Time passes and Sue practically becomes an alligator but she just can’t forget her family so she goes to look for them, another hurricane comes along and after saving the Momma alligator and her new babies Sue finds her house has been blown closer to the alligators. She lives happily ever after with alligators and family alike.

The book was a lot of fun to read, it had a lot of voice and you could really learn a lot about living in a Louisiana swamp and the culture. It had great pictures and was a really fun story with a good moral. - KW

Amelia Bedelia Goes Camping
Written by Peggy Parish; Illustrated by Lynn Sweat
1985
Age Group: 7-10

Amelia Bedelia is known for taking things very literally. When she goes on a camping trip with Mr. and Mrs. Rogers, she is asked to do things like “pitch the tent,” “bring the sleeping bags,” and “put on some coffee.” Will she ever get it right? - KD

Amelia Bedelia, Rocket Scientist?
Written by Herman Parish; Illustrated by Lynn Sweat
2005
Age Group: 7-10

Amelia Bedelia is assigned to help at the local school science fair. Her morning begins when Mr. Rogers sarcastically refers to her as a “rocket scientist” for putting his glasses in the dishwasher, and things are on a hilarious spiral from there. In typical Amelia style, there is an overdone volcano eruption, an unidentified flying hairpiece, a mad scientist, and some of her classic lemon meringue pie. She may not always do everything right, but she is well-loved my her fellow characters, as well as her readers. - KD

Amelia Takes Command
Marissa Moss
January 1999
Ages: 6-11

Amelia is about to embark on the journey of fifth grade…it should be the greatest year in school yet. Too bad it is bound to be the worst ever! With her best friend, Leah, in the other fifth grade class, Mrs. Busby (the bad fifth grade teacher), and horrible Hilary who won’t leave her alone, this year can’t possibly get any worse. Read Amelia’s notebook and get a look into her adventures and how she eventually survives the fifth grade. A great book, seemingly written from an eleven-year-old perspective, the attention to detail in the doodles adds to the humor of this book. - AM

Angelina and the Princess
Katharine Holabird; Illustrated by: Helen Craig
Viking Penguin
Pub. Date: January 2006
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Angelina and the Princess written by Katharine Holabird and illustrated by Helen Craig is the touching story of a little mouse named Angelina. What she wants more than anything is to become a great ballerina---and she is off to a good start being among the top dancers in her ballet school. The opportunity presents itself for the ballet school that Angelina attends to perform for the princess of mouse land. There are two spots open for the lead roles, and Angelina is determined to fill one of those rolls. She is so excited about the performance that she stays up all night practicing, but in the morning she wakes up sick as a dog! Although her mother told her to stay in bed, Angelina sneaks out and goes to the audition anyway. Because she is sick, she cannot perform well, and therefore she does not receive a lead role, but she learns her own smaller part and the lead part by heart, even though she did not get the role, and at the last minute has to fill in for the leading lady who sprained her ankle. Angelina saves the day! - KH

Are You My Mother?
P.D. Eastman
Pub. Date: June 1960
Ages 4-8
64pp

What would you do if you were a baby bird that just hatched but you could not find your mother? “Are You My Mother,” answers that very question. This 63 page children’s book is full of bright pictures and a fun story. In this children’s book the baby bird goes out searching for his mother but he ends up meeting some other animals instead. Read the book to find out if the baby bird finds his mother or if it is a lost cause. - EM

The Art Lesson
Written and Illustrated by Tomie dePaola
Copyright 1997
Ages 5-8
32 pages

A young boy named Tommy loves to draw! He wants to be an artist. He’s excited for first grade were he will be able to have art lessons with a real art teacher! But when he gets to first grade, art lessons are not all that he expected them to be. He does not want to copy things other people draw. He wants to make his own drawings! This story shows how teachers and students can work together to make the learning process engaging for students! It also shows a student that loves art and continues his drawing when he grows up. - FT

Aunt Lucy went to Buy a Hat
Alice Low
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: January 2004
Age Range: 3 to 8
32pp

Summation: This story is about a woman who goes to buy a hat. When she gets to town to buy a hat, she gets sidetracked and ends up buying a cat. She decides to buy milk for the cat, and buys red silk. Lucy makes two more purchases before she remembers the hat she wanted to buy. The cat sees a hat, chases it and brings it to Lucy. They go home.

Comments: This story is full of rhyming words and big bright pictures. The story is silly and fun to read. This is a good story for early readers and to read to preschoolers. What a great book! - KP

Babar’s Museum of Art
Written and Illustrated by Laurent de Brunhoff
2003
Ages 6-9

In another book in the well-beloved Babar series, Babar and Celeste decide to build and furnish an art museum in Celesteville. Walk through the museum with them, deciding which are your favorite pictures and why. Then return home – like Babar and Celeste did – and drew all sorts of pictures, creating your own art museum! - KD

Barfburger Baby, I Was Here First
Paula Danziger, Illustrated by: G. Brian Karas
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: September 2004
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

For a firstborn child it is often difficult to transition into having brothers and sisters that you not only have to share your toys with, but also the attention of all the important adults in life. For a child about to undergo this tough transition, the book Barfburger Baby, I Was Here First is an excellent choice! It takes the child through all of the difficulties that he or she must undergo, while providing ways to cope, and it also shows that every firstborn does have the same feelings, so the child is not going through this hard time alone. I would recommend this book to every family! - KH

Bear Stay Up for Christmas
Karma Wilson
Copyright 2004
Ages 5-7

It’s the day before Christmas and all Bear wants to do is sleep, but his friends have a plan to keep him awake. Every-time Bear tries or thinks he’s going to fall asleep his friends are right there to help him stay awake. Will Bear be able to stay up for Christmas or will he sleep through it? - AP

Because a Little Bug Went Ka-Choo!
Rosetta Stone; Illustrated by: Michael Frith
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 1975
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

It was a quiet summer morning when all of a sudden a little bug sneezed very loudly. The sneeze made a seed drop, and it dropped on a worm’s head. The worm got made and he kicked a tree. A coconut fell out of the tree and hit a turtle on the head. Events continue to happen, all building up to all of the people affected by the sneeze going into town and running into a circus parade. All of these events took place because a little tiny bug sneezed. - JH

Before You Were Born
Nancy White Carlstrom
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Pub. Date: February 2002
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
32pp

What is life like before a baby is born and how does things change once the baby arrives? This story tells what it was like before a couple has their child. Then how things changed once the child was born. - AP

Beauty and the Beast
Retold and illustrated by Jan Brett
Copyright 1990
Ages 5 - 8

A father promises his daughter Beauty a rose on his way home from a trip. He picks the rose from the garden of what turns out to be a Beast, who makes the father promise to return after saying good-bye to his daughters for his punishment (death). Upon hearing this Beauty asks to take his place. Beauty is frightened by the Beast’s appearance (but soon grows to accept him) and his persistent marriage requests. Beauty agrees to spend the rest of her days with him, but asks to go back to go home and tell her family good-bye before she starts her new life. The Beast agrees but asks that Beauty return before the moon is full or his heart will be broken. Will Beauty return to the Beast after having a taste of her former life? - AP

Benny and the Binky
Barbro Lindgren
R & S Books
Pub. Date: April 2002
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
28pp

Summation: Benny gets a new brother, and he doesn’t like him. Instead, Benny likes his brother’s binky. His mom will not let Benny have a binky. So benny takes his little brother outside, takes the binky, and run away. Benny runs by a daycare and they tell Benny he’s too big for a binky. Benny meets some tough pigs who chase him. A big dog saves Benny from the big pigs and makes them give back the binky. Benny goes back to his little brother and gives him the binky.

Comments: Benny’s problem is one that small children can understand. Life gets complicated when you get a new brother or sister. The morale of the story was unclear. This is a good book for early readers or to read to preschoolers. The detailed illustrations and few words make it a great book for non-attentive age children. - KP

The Berenstein Bears and Too Much Junk Food
Stan and Jan Berenstain
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: March 1985
Age Range: 4 to 7
32pp

This Berenstain Bears story is a great story to get kids interested in nutrition and fitness! Brother and Sister Bear have horrible eating habits and love junk food. They were getting quite chubby and mama decided she needed to do something about it. She takes away their junk food and decides they need to get better eating habits. Mama discovers that Papa’s eating habits are just as bad and his habits need to change as well. Mama bear restocks the house with nutritious food and takes the family to Dr. Grizzly to learn more about having a healthy body. The family starts a new exercise routine. Through it all they learn good new habits and have much healthier lives! - JK

The Berenstain Bears Breakfast for Mama
Stan and Jan Berenstain

The Berenstain Bear series is a fun book series to go through with children of all ages. In “The Berenstain Bear Breakfast for Mama”, Brother and Sister and Papa got up early to make a special breakfast in bed for Mama in honor of her birthday. This book even walks the children through how they could do something like what Brother, Sister, and Papa did for their own moms. There are fun and creative ways to make a really special breakfast whatever the season or weather. - EM

Big Moon Tortilla
Written by Joy Cowley, Illustrated by Dyanne Strongbow
Copyright 2004
Ages 4 - 8
32 pages

What should you do when you have a problem? Marta Enos homework had flown out the window and was chewed up by dogs! When she tried to steal back one homework sheet from a puppy, her glasses fell off and broke! Overwhelmed by her problems she ran to her grandmother. Her grandmother told her an old Native American saying about dealing with your problems. After comfort and a big moon tortilla from her grandmother, Marta Enos decided to be the Eagle from the Native American saying, flying high above her problems and seeing how small they really were. I like all the metaphors in this story. The illustrations took a more realistic look when drawing the characters in the story. I also liked that the author included background information about the Native American saying. Overall this was a wonderful book that can help children learn how to face problems. - FT

A Bird or Two
Bijou Le Tord
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Pub. Date: September 1999
Age Range: 7 to 10
35pp

An old man looks around and cannot stop painting everything he sees. “A Bird or Two” is a color-filled book that could inspire any child to love painting. Every page in this book is full of bright colors and look like someone hand painted every page. The old man does not give any limitations to his art. He paints simple stick people and extravagant woman with pearl necklaces. - EM

The Black Snowman
Written by Phil Mendez; Illustrated by Carole Byard
1989
Ages 8 - 12
 
Jacob is tired of hearing that everything good is white, and everything black is bad. White knights are good; black magic is bad; white snow is pure and beautiful; and black snow has been trampled and driven on by people and cars, etc. He thinks that even being black is bad, because his family is black and they are poor. Jacob hates being black until the night he and his little brother, Peewee, make a black snowman that comes to life. The snowman dances, changes color, talks and promises them some magic! Then one night, Jacob’s house goes up in flames. The snowman encourages Jacob that he can save Peewee from the tragic inferno. The snowman finally teaches Jacob that there is more to African ancestry than the color of the skin. There are great heroes in African literature, and Jacob finally learns that, at the close of the book, he can be one, too. - KD

Bread and Jam for Francis
Russell Hoban; Illustrated by: Lillian Hoban
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: January 1993
Copyright: 1964
48 pages
Ages: 4-8

Frances is a very picky eater. She does not like eggs with her breakfast but she loves bread and jam! She does not like what mother cooks for dinner either but she loves bread and jam! Frances starts eating bread and Jam all the time but she soon decides that it is a lot of bread and Jam. Albert at school has all sorts of things to eat for lunch but Frances just has bread and jam. Frances gets very tired of bread and jam. She decides that she wants to eat other kinds of foods too. Frances loses her picky ways and is soon enjoying all sorts of delicious foods! - JK

Brown Bear, Brown Bear What Do You See?
Bill Martin Jr.; Illustrator: Eric Carle
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Pub. Date: September 1996
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
32p.

Summation: This is a story of animals and colors. It is a guessing game for children. On each page the book asks that animal, “What do you see?”, which reveals the colored animal on the next page. At the end of the book there is a group of children who go through the list of all the different colored animals seen in the book.

Comments: This is a wonderful book to read to small children. The brightly colored animals that fill the page with the continuing question of “What do you see?”, makes this book enjoyable and memorable for small children. - KP

*****

This book is full of animals a brown bear, a white dog, a purple cat, all looking at something. Each page brings a new animal, a new color and a new answer to what do you see? Even the teacher and the children make it into this book.

Full of fun illustrations and rhyming that children of all ages will love, this is another Carle classic that will never go out of style. It’s easy to read and great for new readers. - KW

Bubble Gum, Bubble Gum
Lisa Wheele
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Pub. Date: April 2004
Age Range: 3 to 6
32pp

A chewy-gooey, icky-sticky piece of bubble gum is lying in the sun, melting on the road. The frog goes walking by and SPLAT he’s stuck in the gum. What’s a frog to do? Then along came the shrew, and the crow, and the bee, and the goose! And what about the truck and the big grizzly bear?!? Watch these animals and see how they get out of this sticky mess. - AM

Burger Boy
Alan Durant
October 2006
Ages: 5-8

Benny despises vegetables and refuses to eat anything but burgers. Then, just like his mother warned, Benny turns into a burger! What’s a boy to do when nobody around will believe he’s not a burger. Come on this wild adventure with Benny and learn a very important lesson in health. - AM

Buster
Written by Denis Fleming
Ages 4-7
Copyright 2003
40 pages

Buster is a dog that is completely content with his life. He has everything he could ever need. But then Brown Shoes (his owner) brings home the big box. Inside this infamous box is a cat named Betty and Buster is afraid of cats! Betty just will not leave Buster alone. Finally he can not take it any longer! He runs away! Buster finds out in the end that maybe Betty is not so bad after all. I think this is a great book for children to see that change isn’t necessarily bad. It also helps them see they should give others a chance, even if they are different. - FT

Caps for Sale
Esphyr Slobodkina
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: March 2008
Age Range: 1 to 7
32pp

A man goes around town trying to sell caps. He carries each one on his head, one on top of the other beginning with his own. The man is not successful selling caps in town, so he goes into the country. He finds a nice tree, and he sits down and falls asleep. When he wakes up, he feels his head to make sure all of the caps are there. He only feels his own hat. He looks up into the tree and he sees monkeys wearing his caps. He yells at them to give them back, but they refuse. Finally the man walks away and the monkeys throw the caps on to the ground. The man goes back to get his caps, puts them firmly and neatly back on his head, and makes his way back into town. - JH

Cha Cha Chimps
Written by Julia Durango Illustrated by Eleanor Taylor
Copyright 2006
Ages 2-6
32 pages

Ten little chimps decide to sneak out to Mambo Jamba’s ready to dance the night away. Counting backwards from ten the chimps all take part doing the cha-cha-cha. They dance with all the different animals in the jungle. The chimps’ night of dancing comes to an end when their mother finds them and sends them back to bed. But the chimps are not the only ones who like to dance at Mambo Jamba’s! This book has detailed illustrations and fun noises that kids will enjoy. It also has a mathematical aspect as you count backwards from ten.

A Chair for My Mother
Vera B. Williams
Copyright 1982
Ages 3 - 8

Rosa and her family lose everything they own in a fire! Their Neighbors pitch in to help furnish their new home. Yet Rosa’s family still do not have a big fluffy chair for her mother to rest in after a long day at the diner. So Rosa and her family get the largest jar they can find start to save what ever extra money they can to buy a big fluffy, comfy chair. Can they save enough money to buy the perfect chair? - AP

A Charlie Brown Christmas
Charles M. Schulz
Perseus Publishing
Pub. Date: October 2003
128pp

It is Christmastime and Charlie Brown is depressed. He does not know why. He is confronted with the materialism of Christmas and he knows there must be something else. He tries to direct the Christmas play but that does not work. The tree he buys is small and ugly. Finally Charlie Brown asks if anyone can tell him what Christmas is all about. Linus tells him the story of the angel announcing to the shepherds the birth of Jesus. Charlie Brown finally found the meaning of Christmas. His friends help him decorate the tree, and everyone finally understands what Christmas is all about. - JH

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom
Marten and John Archambault ; Illustrated by: Lois Elhert
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: October 1989
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
40pp

A told B and B told C, I’ll meet you to the top of the coconut tree. And the race is on as all of the letters race to the top of the tree, Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. Will there be enough room. Just as the Z is climbing up, the tree topples over from too much weight and the letters all come tumbling down with it. Every one is all beat up with numerous and various images, but before long A is back again, this time double daring every one to race.

This book has been around for a long time and because of its enjoyable rhyming and bold, colorful illustrations it has always been and will continue to be a favorite of children, parents and teachers alike. - KW

Chrysanthemum
Kevin Henkes
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 1996
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Chrysanthemum loves everything about her name, the way it sounds, and the way it looks when it’s written. That is until the first day of school. Where she I daunted by the other students the worst of all being a girl named Victoria. “You’re named after a flower”. This goes on for a couple of days. Until the day Chrysanthemum’s class meet their music teacher Mrs. Twinkle. When Victoria starts her taunting Mrs. Twinkle lets the class in on a secret. What is Mrs. Twinkle’ secret? - AP

*****
This is a fun story that deals with elementary school social issues. Chrysanthemum is excited to be going to school. When she gets to school everyone teases her about her name. Her parents tell her it is perfect but she does not believe them. She hates the teasing so much that she has a dream about changing her name to June. One day a music teacher that all the students love tells the students that she has a long name and is named after a flower and from then on all of the girls in the classroom want to change their names to be like the music teacher and Chrysanthemum. - RC

Chugga-Chugga Choo-Choo
Written by Kevin Lewis, Illustrated by Daniel Kirk
Copyright 1999
Ages 2-5
32 pages

From morning to bedtime, this story shows the imaginary day of a toy choo-choo train. All the toys load the freight, and the train then takes a journey through the different parts of a young boy’s room. The story uses rhyme and wonderful read aloud sounds; “Chugga-chugga choo-choo wheels a-turning Whoooooooo! Whoooooooo!” In the end the toy train is safely in bed with its owner. I enjoyed the illustrations in this story, they were bright and interesting including many basic shapes. I really enjoyed the rhyming and sounds, it would be a great story to read aloud to younger children. - FT

Click, Clack, Moo Cows That Type
Doreen Cronin; Illustrated by: Betsy Lewin
Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: February 2000
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Farmer Brown hears a typing sound coming from the barn. He goes to see what is happening, and finds a type-written note from his cows telling him that they are cold and would like to have some electric blankets. He refuses and the cows go on strike. He gets another note that the hens would like electric blankets. He refuses and the hens go on strike. He writes his own note and tells them that they are hens and cows and that he demands milk and eggs. The animals finally agree to trade their typewriter for some electric blankets. The farmer agrees. He puts the blankets outside the barn door and waits for the duck to bring the typewriter. The next morning, the farmer gets a note saying that the ducks are bored in their pond and they would like to have a diving board. - JH

Clifford’s Loose Tooth
Adapted by Wendy Cheyette Lewison
Illustrated by John and Sandrina Kurtz
February 2002
Reading Level: 5-7 Years

Clifford discovers he has a loose tooth. It wiggles, and wobbles, and worries him. Emily Elizabeth tells him that when it falls out it will be replaced by a bigger tooth, and the tooth fairy will come take away the old tooth and leave a treat in its place. Clifford and his friends decide to help the tooth come out early so Clifford can get his treat sooner. Their suggestions get wilder and wilder: pulling the tooth out, sneezing it out, and chewing lots and lots of bubble gum. But nothing works until one day it just comes out all by itself and Clifford gets the treat he’s been waiting for.

Clifford is back in a book based on his TV show, for kids who watch the show it would be a lot of fun to be able to read about it as well, and as with every one of his books, Clifford learns an important lesson. - KW

Clifford’s Tricks
Written and Illustrated by Norman Birdwell
February 1980
Reading Level: 4-6 Years

A new family moves in next door to Emily Elizabeth and Clifford, they have a little girl, Martha and she has a dog named Bruno. Bruno knows lots of tricks, so does Clifford, but sometimes he causes a little trouble, he never can seem to do anything right. When Martha decides to walk on the side of the bridge, she slips and falls and Bruno jumps into save her, but he isn’t strong enough, but Clifford saves the day and everyone forgives him for all the trouble he made with his tricks. - KW

Kids love the classic stories of the larger than life dog named Clifford and this story is just as fun as all of the others, it has great illustrations and is great for beginning readers. - KW

Clouds for Dinner
Written and Illustrated by Lynne Rae Perkins
Copyright 1997
Ages 5-10
29 pages

Janet isn’t sure she likes that her mother refers to “pink clouds” at sunset, or her father saying “This melon tastes just like a cloud!” She’s too smart for that. Her parents just wish she would get into her imagination more. Will she ever get it? - KD

Come Back, Amelia Bedelia
Written by: Peggy Parish; Illustrated by: Wallace Tripp
Copyright: 1971
64 pages
Ages: 4-8

Amelia Bedelia is a character who will amuse just about everyone. She has a problem with taking things too literally. She messes up things with her employer and is fired. On the search for another job Amelia Bedelia’s habit of taking things literally keeps getting in the way. She cannot seem to find another job and eventually ends up back at her original employer’s house. She is taken back as an employee gladly because she is so missed!

Come Out, Come Out!
Written by Pat Lowery Collins, Illustrated by Dee Huxley
Ages 5-6
Copyright 2005
32 pages.

Hildy is upset so Hildy decides to hide. She likes to hide when she is upset. Her whole family is looking for her like they usually do. This time is different, she will not be found! She plans to hide forever because she is so angry. She can hear her family as they search for her but this time she will not be tempted by any bribes to come out. Her family gets closer and closer, when they have find the spot where she is hiding they joke about tickles and kisses and hugs. With all the tickles, kisses, and hugs, Hildy’s anger dies down and she is happy to be found! The story has interesting illustrations that seem to emphasize movement of the characters in the story. I especially like the illustrations of Hildy as she hides in the pile of leaves. - FT

Corduroy
Don Freeman
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Pub. Date: September 1976
Copyright: 1968
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

Corduroy was a stuffed bear that lived in a department store. People came to the store all the time but no one seemed to want him except for one very special little girl. Corduroy finds his flaw to be a missing button. That night after everyone had left corduroy goes in search of his missing button all over the department store. He makes a ruckus and the security guard finds him and puts him back where he belongs. The next day the little girl, Lisa, comes and buys corduroy! She takes him home and sews on a new button for him! Corduroy is so happy to finally have a home! - JK

*****
A little teddy bear lives in a department store. One day a little girl comes to the store and sees the teddy bear. She wants to buy him, but the little girl’s mother says no because the bear has a missing button on his corduroy overalls. The little bear goes searching all over the store for a button that he can put on his overalls. He did not find a button, but a security guard found him and put him back on the shelf. The next morning, the little girl came into the store and bought the teddy bear. She took him home and sewed a new button on his overalls. - JH

Cousin Ruth’s Tooth
Amy MacDonald
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: May 2003
Age Range: 3 to 8
32pp

Cousin Ruth cannot seem to find her tooth anywhere! Join Cousin Ruth’s strange family as they search high and low to find her missing tooth. Listen as Ruth and even the Queen try to solve the mystery behind the missing tooth! This book is laced with silly rhyme that is sure to make any young child giggle…for ever more fun, try singing the words to the tune of “Clementine.” - AM

The Cow That Went OINK
Written and Illustrated by Bernard Most
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 2003
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
40pp

What is a cow to do when he can only oink and what is a pig to do when it can only moo? All the other animals make fun of them because they are different. So they work together to teach one another how to make the right noise. In the end they both will have “the last laugh”! There friendship helps them both grow individually. I liked the way the characters helped each other in this story. This story can help children see how to help one another overcome problems by working together. - FT

Coyote: A Trickster Tale From The American Southwest
Written by Gerald McDermott
Copyright 1999
Ages 4-8
32 pages

Coyote was always getting in mischief of one kind or another. He got in trouble with a badger, a woodpecker and a snake. One day he saw a flock of crows and they were chanting and dancing. Soon he saw the crows fly in the sky. He desperately wanted to fly like the crows and begged them to let him join them. They let Coyote join them so they could have fun with his foolishness. The once blue coyote ends up with a burnt tail and covered in dust from his attempts to fly, to this day he looks the same. The story has colorful and silly illustrations as Coyote engages in his acts of mischief. Another important aspect of this story is the lesson of consequences for actions. - FT

Coyote Raidin Cactus Canyon
Jim Arnosky
February 2005
Ages: 4-8

All if peaceful in Cactus Canyon and all of the animals are minding their own business until…the coyotes come! The coyotes are mean and wreak havoc on the animals in the canyon; all the animals except for one that is. See who teaches those coyotes a lesson and returns Cactus Canyon peaceful again. - AM

The Cuddle Book
Written and Illustrated by Guido Van Genechten
December 2004
Reading Level: Infants to Preschool age

Hugs are great from anyone, a big hug, a little hug, a pig hug, a bear hug. No matter what it’s nice to cuddle and makes you feel warm inside. But the best hug of all comes from your mommy.

This book was very simple, with just a few easy words on each page and matching plain illustrations it would be great to read to little kids and then have them read back to you when they start to read themselves. - KW

Curious George
H.A. Rey
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: February 1973
Copyright: 1941
Age Range: 4 to 7
64pp

This book is a much loved classic by many about a very curious monkey. It begins with him still in Africa. His adventures begin when he is curious about the man in the yellow hat. The man in the yellow hat takes George to a big city in the big boat. George gets into all sorts of trouble on the boat. After they arrive in the man’s city George goes home with him and before you know the fire station is called and George is in jail! George has all sorts of adventures but eventually makes it into the zoo! - JK

The man with the yellow hat went to Africa. While he was there, he found a monkey. He decided to take the monkey home with him, and he named him George. George was very curious. He got into trouble when he was in the city by calling the fire department, going to prison, and accidentally taking balloons and flying away. Finally the man with the yellow hat found George and took him to live in the zoo. - JH

Curious George Goes to the Beach
Margaret & H.A. Rey
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: October 1999
Age Range: 5 to 8
24pp

The Curious George series is a entertaining series of books. In the book “Curious George Goes to the Beach”, as always, Curious George got a little too curious. As Curious George was getting a snack, he made friends with a sea gull. Then he saw more sea gulls near the water with his friend Betsy. He was concerned that the other sea gulls were hungry so he decided to go feed them some food. While feeding the sea gulls, George did not realize that his picnic basket was moving out to sea. Will George be able to save the basket? - EM

Curious George Visits a Toy Store
H. A. Rey
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: August 2002
Age Range: 5 to 8
24pp

Curious George, the adorable little monkey that has become a household name across America, always has a lesson to teach readers about the hazards of being too curious, as kids always are. H. A. Rey's Curious George Visits a Toy Store is no exception. There's a new toy store in town, and what kind of grand opening would it have if Curious George wasn't there? As the doors open, George dashes past the owner, who doesn't exactly think it's the best place for a monkey to be. As always George's curiosity gets the best of him and he winds up making a huge mess, but he sure did have fun doing it! - KH

The Daddy Mountain
Written and Illustrated by Jules Feiffer
Hyperion Books for Children
Pub. Date: June 2004
Age Range: 3 to 6
32pp

The little girl is preparing to climb the daddy mountain but she is scared and it will be hard, so she better get a drink of water first. Finally she climbs onto his feet, reaches for his belt and pulls herself up, she rests on his knees and then continues on. Luckily the daddy mountain is wearing a tie so she can pull herself up, she reaches the shoulder and flips one leg over, it is very scary and dangerous. After a very long struggle, she is finally at the top, but it’s a very long ways down, and Mommy is very nervous.

What a great way to look at something from a child’s perspective. Kids love to climb on their parents and this book tells the story of the little girl trying to reach her fathers shoulders. It has great, roughly sketched pictures and is easy enough for young kids to read. - KW

David Goes to School
David Shannon
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: August 1999
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

A young boy named David goes to school. His teacher definitely has a challenge as David pushes all sorts of limits. He chews gum in class. He does not raise his hand to speak, and can not keep his hands to himself. Although David has a lot to learn about being a good student, his teacher still sees his potential. I think the illustrations in the book are humorous and appealing for students. I liked how the teacher was able to find something positive in David through all his behavioral problems. - FT

Diary of a Worm
Doreen Cronin; Illustrator: Harry Bliss
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: July 2003
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

Ever wonder what a worm would write in his diary? April 15: “I forgot my lunch today. I got so hungry that I ate my homework. My teacher made me write, “I will not eat my homework ten times.” When I was finished I ate that too”. June 5: “Today we made macaroni necklaces in art class. I brought mine home and we ate it for dinner. - AP

*****
Have you ever thought what a worm would say if they could talk or write? Well, in “Diary of a Worm” we meet a worm that keeps a diary. Children will laugh and learn about worms as this book is read. Children will see how worms help the earth and imagine what a life as a worm would be like. How would you always like to be worrying about people stepping on you or digging you up for fishing? - EM

Don’t Be Silly, Mrs. Millie!
Written by Judy Cox, Illustrated by Joe Mathieu
Copyright 2005
Ages 5-7
32 pages.

Mrs. Millie is very silly. She is always mixing up words when she talks to her class. Her class has to tell her, “don’t be silly, Mrs. Millie!” They help correct her when she misuses words. They imagine what things would be like if what she said was true. In the end Mrs. Millie’s silliness becomes contagious and the students start to make up there own silly sentences! The illustrations in this book are very silly and very detailed! I think this is a perfect book for a fun story time where students get to hear and see the difference between similar sounding words.

The Dream Jar
Lindan Lee Johnson
November 2005
Ages: 5-8

Bad dreams seem to be a regular part of this little girl’s life. If it weren’t for her big sister who knew everything, she would never have good dreams. Everything is fine until her sister is invited to a sleep over. How can a little sister possibly sleep without her big sister? Because big sisters know everything, this girl learns the secret to making every bad dream good and the magic of the dream jar. - AM

Eat!” Cried Little Pig
Jonathan London; Illustrator: Delphine Durrand
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Pub. Date: October 2003
Age Range: 4 to 6
32pp

Summation: This story is about a little pig who is learning how to speak. He likes the word “eat” and makes a big mess while he’s eating. After dinner, there was food everywhere, on everything. He got cleaned up and said, “Neat!”. Then, after his mom gave him dessert, he said, “Sweet”, and began making a mess again.

Comments: This book is perfect for infants and toddlers. I would recommend this book to be read in a one-on-one setting so the humor can be appreciated with long, drawn out laughter. KP

Eat Your Peas, Ivy Louise!
Written and Illustrated by Leo Landry
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: May 2005
Age Range: 1 to 6
32pp

Ivy Louise is a young child faced with the daunting task of eating peas at dinnertime. She watches her peas perform various circus acts right on her tray, entertaining her until they finally leap out the window in the grand finale of the night. Her parents see a few little vegetables, but Ivy Louise sees hours of fun! – KD

Enemy Pie
Derek Munson; Illustrated by: Tara Callahan King
Chronicle Books Llc
Pub. Date: September 2000
40pp
Ages: 5-8

Have you ever had an enemy? The boy in this book has and he’s afraid this enemy is going to ruin his life! What’s a boy to do? He talks to his dad and asks him what he should do. His dad has a great idea, an idea he used to get rid of his enemy when he was a little boy. He’s going to make Enemy Pie! What’s in an Enemy Pie you ask? Much more than you would imagine. Read to find out just exactly how this boy gets rid of his enemy. - AM

Fall Leaves Fall
Zoe Hall; Illustrated by: Shari Halpern
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: September 2000
Copyright 1957
40pp
Ages 3 - 6

Two children have decided that fall is their favorite season of the year. They know fall is coming because they watch the leaves all year long. During the summer, the leaves are green. But when Autumn approaches, the leaves start to change. Follow their story of why they love this season in this fun, colorful story about fall! - KD

Fiesta
Ginger Foglesong Guy; Illustrated by: Rene King Moreno
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: January 2003
34 pages
Ages 5-up

This book introduces Spanish words and the Spanish numbers 1-10. Three children go shopping for different items to put in a piñata for a fiesta (party). The story gives the words first in Spanish and then below in English. The phrase, “¿Qué Más?” (What else?), is repeated after each item in purchased. The story concludes with the making of a piñata and a fiesta. This story is a fun way to introduce Spanish numbers and words to children. It is a fun read aloud because of the repetition of the phrase “¿Qué Más?” - FT

Fire Cat
Esther Averill
Barnes & Noble
Pub. Date: July 2006
Copyright: 1983
Ages : 4-8
64 pages

This is a story about Pickles the cat. Pickles lives in a barrel and chases all the other cats in the neighborhood. Mrs. Goodkind tries to help pickles by giving him a home but pickles just wants his barrel. While chasing a cat one day pickles gets stuck in a tree in a rain storm. Pickles is rescued by a fireman named Joe who takes pickles to go live at the firehouse. Pickles learns how to be a fire cat, including going down the fire pole and sitting in the fire truck! Pickles earns his very own fire hat. Pickles also learns how to be nice to the other cats and in the end gets to rescue a cat from a tree just like he had been stuck. Pickles is a good fire cat! - JK

First Grade, Here I Come
Nancy Carlson
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: July 2006
Age Range: 4 to 7
32pp

First grade is so scary and Henry is sure he will never like it. First of all, his teacher is a man and not a woman like his Kindergarten teacher. He doesn’t know anyone in his new first grade class, the fifth graders hog the monkey bars, and the lunchroom is scary. When Henry’s mom comes to pick him up he begins to tell her about his day and as he’s telling her, he realizes that maybe first grade isn’t so bad after all. - AM

First Graders from Mars – Episode 1: Horus’s Horrible Day
Shana Corey; Illustrated by: Mark Teague
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: July 2001
Age Range: 4 to 7
32pp

Horus is excited about first grade until he realizes that it is not the same as martiangarten. There are a lot of things about first grade he does not expect, so he decides he will not return. That is, until he meets Pelly, a friend who is also nervous about going to first grade. Will Horus be able to convince her that first grade can be good for them? - KD

Franklin Plays the Game
Paulette Bourgeois; Illustrated by: Brenda Clark
1995
Ages 6 - 9

 Franklin, Beaver, Rabbit, Goose, and Bear form a soccer team, but they do not seem to be scoring any goals – much less, winning any games. After consistently losing, the five finally realize their individual strengths, pulling them together, and teaching each one of them – and their readers – a lesson in teamwork. - KD

Franklin and the Thunderstorm
Paulette Bourgeois; Illustrated by Brenda Clark
1998
Ages 6 - 9

All of Franklin’s friends love thunderstorms. They end up at Fox’s house during the storm, and they end up teaching Turtle all about how thunderstorms work; and why there is no reason to be afraid of a simple storm. – KD

Frederick
Leo Lionni
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: April 1973
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Summation: Frederick is the story of five little mice as they prepare for and wait out the winter. Four of the little mice are busy gathering supplies for the winter ahead. When they ask Frederick what he is doing, he says he is gathering. But Frederick is gathering sun rays, colors, and words. Winter begins and the mice are happy until their food runs out. But then Frederick uses words to give them what he has gathered, through poetry.

Comments: Frederick is a story of appreciation. Frederick shows the mice through his poetry that he has worked through the fall, just like the other four. This story teaches children that we all have gifts to share with others and that we are all important. I would recommend this book to early readers and for reading to preschoolers. - KP

Frida
Jonah Winter
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: February 2002
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Summation: The book tells the story of Frida. It tells a book about her beginning as a child with imaginary friends that keep her company. When Friday gets sick and can’t get well, she starts to draw. Later, she begins to paint on photographs. Frida has a accident which leaves her in the hospital. She spends her time painting many pictures.

Comments: This is a great historical book for young children. It portrays the heartache she experienced in life in a soft, careful way. The illustrations are magnificent and could tell the story without words. It’s a great educational book to read to younger children and for early readers to pick up. - KP

Froggy Goes to School
Written by Jonathan London; Illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz
Copyright 1998
Ages 3-6
32 pages

The first day of school is an important day! Froggy wakes up late and realizes that he has missed the bus! He jumps out of bed and forgets to get dressed. On the bus he realizes that he is in his underwear! Good luck that this turns out to be a dream and his first day of school is actually much better. He finds his name on his desk, has trouble sitting still, and quickly learns about rules. All in all it is a wonderful first day of school. I enjoyed this story. It seems like a good book to read to children going into kindergarten. It touches on different aspects of the classroom that students will encounter.

A Fruitcake Christmas
Troy Schmidt
Thomas Nelson
Pub. Date: October 2005
Age Range: 3 to 8

Have you ever imagined caterpillars, ladybugs, and ants spending Christmas Eve together celebrating Jesus’ birth? It all happens in “A Fruitcake Christmas”. This fun filled Christmas story tells the true meaning of Christmas. When you mix a missing fruitcake and a couple very rich greedy cockroaches things can get messy. Thanks to some very generous baby ladybugs, all of the bugs of the garden learn a very important lesson about what Christmas is all about, how to be kind to someone who is greedy and what a difference it can make to show a little kindness! - EM

Gingerbread Friends
Jan Brett
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: September 2008
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

The gingerbread man goes a journey to try and find friends. When he meets some treats he tries to get them to be his friends by dancing for them. They all just stand there and don’t say a word so he gets very sad and heads back home. As he is heading home he is getting chased by a bunch of hungry creatures. He gets home and when he walks in he has a surprise!!!! Some gingerbread friends!!! - RC

Gitchi Gumee
Anne Margaret Lewis; Illustrated by: Kathleen Chaney Fritz
Mackinac Island Press, Inc.
Pub. Date: March 2006
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Gitchi Gumee is the name of a great body of water. A young boy wishes to sail this body of water, and he asks Gitchi Gumee if it would be all right for him to do that. Gitchi Gumee tells the boy that he is still very young. He shows the boy his many faces, whether he is calm and serene or violent and dangerous. The young boy sails with Gitchi Gumee through all seasons and all moods. Finally, the boy makes it back to shore and he has learned from Gitchi Gumee. He is now a man. - JH

The Goodbye Boat
Mary Joslin
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Pub. Date: March 1999
28pp

The not very wordy book “The Goodbye Boat”, is a vibrant book that shows how special friends should be to us. It shows the process that people go through when someone they love has to leave them. “The Goodbye Boat”, shows children that it is okay to be sad when someone they love leaves them. However, it does show how we can still have fun until that someone we love comes back. - EM

Goodnight Moon 1,2,3 (2007)
Based on the book by by Margaret Wise Brown; Illustrated by Clement Hurd
2007
Ages 4-7

Counting many things in the house can put someone to sleep. Count from one to ten and skip right to the 100 stars in the sky in this educational adaptation of the classic “Goodnight Moon” by Margaret Wise Brown. – KD

This story is about a little bunny who seems to have a bit of difficulty falling asleep. His room appears to be a safe, familiar place. As he looks at the details of everything in his room—his comb, brush, pictures, the scene from his window, and even the bowl of mush on his table—Bunny says goodnight to them all and is able to drift into a comfortable, safe sleep.

Reaction : This was a very simple, cute story. The illustrations were nice and calm, very pleasant for a bedtime story. - EH

Good Night, Owl
Written and Illustrated by Pat Hutchins
April 1990
Reading Level: Infants to Preschool age

Poor Owl just wants to sleep, but it proves almost impossible as all kinds of animals come to his tree and make quite a large racket. Bees are buzzing, squirrels are chattering and all kinds of birds are making noise, so Owl waits patiently all day to get some revenge, and when the other animals rest, Owl is the one making all the noise.

This is a fun, cumulative book to read. It introduces a lot of different animals and keeps you guessing until the end. - KW

A Good Night Walk
Written and Illustrated by Elisha Cooper
2005
Ages 4-7
15 pages
Take a walk along the block and see what goes on. What is the difference between what goes on during the day and at night? Watch the mail being delivered, hear the screen door opening and shutting, smell the scent of apple pie wafting out of the windows into the streets. - KD

Gracias The Thanksgiving Turkey
Written by Joy Cowley, Illustrated by Joe Cepeda
Ages 4-8
Copyright 2005
32 pages.

Miguel is getting a surprise from his father who is gone for work. What could it be, rollerblades or a baseball glove? No… It’s a turkey! Miguel is supposed to fatten the turkey up for Thanksgiving when his father will return from work. Tia Rosa already foresees the problems of keeping a turkey in a New York City apartment, but Miguel’s Abuelo lets him keep the bird. Miguel quickly becomes the bird’s amigo, naming her Gracias. Throughout the story Miguel takes care of Gracias. The familia ends up having chicken for Thanksgiving! This story is filled with Spanish words and Spanish culture. The author has included a glossary of the Spanish words used in the story. - FT

Grandpa For Sale
Dotti Enderle and Vickie Sansom; Illustrator: T. Kyle Gentry
Flashlight Press
Pub. Date: April 2007
Age Range: 5 to 7
32pp

Annotation : Oldman’s Store is a quaint little family-owned antique shop. Lizzie, who works around the store, has been left to watch things while her mother is out. A woman names Mrs. Larchmont and her poodle Giselle enter into the store to browse. After selecting a few smaller items, Mrs. Larchmont happens across Lizzie’s grandfather asleep on an old antique sofa. Mrs. Larchmont is enthralled with this piece and offers $500 for the old antique. Initially, Lizzie assumes that Mrs. Larchmont is referring to the sofa. She quickly learns, however, that Mrs. Larchmont really wants to buy grandpa! Lizzie thinks of all of the things that she could buy with the increasing amounts of money that Mrs. Larchmont offers her for the sale of grandpa. Each time, however, Lizzie realizes that the things she could buy would be nothing if her grandpa was not there to share them with her. Lizzie informs Mrs. Larchmont that Grandpa is not for sale and that some things in life cannot be bought.

Reaction : This story was excellent and the illustrations were amazing. Nice contrast between use of color and black/white which really emphasizes the theme of the story. - EH

Grandpa’s Soup
Eiko Kadono and illustrated by Satomi Ichikawa
Copyright 1997
Ages 5-8

Longing for something familiar after the death of his wife an old man tries to make his wife’s meatball soup. His first attempt does not go quite as planned but does bring a couple of visitors. The second attempt gets better and brings more visitors. The third time Grandpa perfects the soup and brings a house full of guests. - AP

The Greatest Show on Earth
John Prater
Candlewick Press
Pub. Date: March 1997
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

Summation: Harry lives and works with the circus. His family members are all a part of the circus: acrobats, a juggler, cyclists, and strongwoman. Harry doesn’t have any tricks to perform, so he takes care of Wellington the dog. One night, at the show, Wellington sees a mouse and their show goes crazy. That is the night they all cheer, for they realize that Harry is a clown!

Comments: This book is set up in a sort of comic action strip. There are a lot of speech bubbles with mumbled words. For those reasons, I would recommend this book for elementary readers. It would be fun to read and there are lots of separate pictures to see. This book teaches the important lesson that we all are special and have something to contribute, even if it’s laughter! - KP

Green Eggs and Ham
Dr. Seuss
Publisher: Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: August 1960
Age Range: 5 to 8
72pp

In this well loved Dr. Seuss book Sam is trying to sell green eggs and ham. The other character insists that he does not like green eggs and ham. Sam is persistent he offers them in many different settings and many different ways. But it is said “I do not like green eggs and ham, I do not like them Sam I am.” Eventually the other character gets so tired of Sam that he says he will try him if that means Sam will leave him alone. After trying them he decides that he really does like green eggs and ham and he would like to eat them anywhere and all the different ways! - JK

The Grouchy Ladybug
Eric Carle
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 1996
Age Range: 4 to 6
48pp

The grouchy ladybug is about to learn an important lesson in manners. After refusing to share a leaf full of aphids, the ladybug spends all day asking all kinds of animals to fight. Read the rest to find out which one finally teaches him a lesson. - AM

Grover’s Own Alphabet
Sal Murdocca
Western Publishing Company, Inc.
Pub. Date: January 1978
Age Range: 5 to 6

Furry, loveable Grover is back to help us learn the alphabet. It takes a lot of hard work, stretching and creativity but he bends himself into all the letters of the alphabet. Each page has some text that begins with the letter that Grover is making and talks about all he is doing just to help us.

This book is not only a great tool to help teach the alphabet, but it’s a new, creative way to learn and lots of fun to see Grover twist and turn. - KW

Hansel and Gretel
Retold by James Marshall
Copyright 1994
Ages 4-8
32 pages

Hansel and Gretel were children of a poor woodcutter. The woodcutter and his wife did not have much money and when famine came they were running out of food to eat. The woodcutter’s wife did not like the children and talked the woodcutter into leaving them in the forest. Hansel heard the plan and gathered white pebbles to lead them back to the house. Hansel’s plan worked the first time there was a famine but the second time there was a famine his trail of breadcrumbs was eaten by birds. The children found a candy covered house in the forest and began to eat from its roof and windows. A witch came from inside the house and cooked them a wonderful meal and put them to bed. The next morning she through the Hansel in a cage and made Gretel her slave. Gretel saved herself and her brother by tricking the witch into the oven. The children found gems and gold coins in the witch’s house that they brought back to their father. This book was a good rendition of the tale of Hansel and Gretel. I feel like this tale is a little bit violent for children. - FT

Happy Birth Day!
Written By Robie H. Harris
Illustrate by Michael Emberley
May 2002
Reading Level: 5-8 years

A new baby is something very special and these parents love every bit of their new baby. They share with us the entire first day, from screaming to opening her eyes, sucking her thumb and nursing. Sleep finally comes to this new little family and after such a long day, the baby deserves a happy birth day wish.

With excellent illustrations that are very realistic and heartwarming, this book will automatically remind you a special baby you know and every exciting thing that happens on the first day they are a part of this world. - KW

The Hat
Jan Brett
Copyright 1999
Ages 5-6

Winter is on the way so Lisa hangs her woolen clothes to air out. But a strong wind blows a stocking off the line, and it find its way to a curious hedgehog (Hedgie) who gets it stuck on his prickles. An embarrassed Hedgie goes a through the farm yard meeting up with various farm animals and explains that the stocking is his new hat thus giving the others ideas. Can Hedgie get the stocking off his prickles and what ideas is he giving the other farm animals? Read this beautifully illustrated story to find out. - AP

Henry and Amy
Written by Stephen Michael King
Illustrated by John Ward
April 1999
Reading Level: 3-6 years

Henry and Amy are very different. Henry can’t draw a straight line, his clothes never match, he doesn’t know up from down or left from right, and no matter how hard he tries he just can’t walk forward. Henry thinks Amy does everything perfectly, she dresses well, always remembers her umbrella and can even write her own name. When they decide to build a tree house, Amy makes the blueprint while Henry adds lots of squigglies and wigglies. Amy wishes she wasn’t so perfect so Henry teaches her everything he knows. Now Henry and Amy are the best of friends, right way round and upside down.

This book is full of fun illustrations and shows that everyone is special in their own way and even opposites can be very best friends. It’s fun to read and a great story. - KW

He’s Got the Whole World in His Hands
Written By Kadir Nelsonb
Ages 4-6
Copyright 2005
32 pages.

This book has fantastic illustrations! The song “He’s Go the Whole World in His Hands” is accompanied by these illustrations for different parts of the lyrics. An African American boy is the main character of the pictures. This book also includes the music together with the lyrics for the song on the last pages. This would be a fun book to read and sing with students. I believe that students would enjoy the colorful illustrations. - FT

Heaven’s All-Star Jazz Band
Written and Illustrated by Don Carter
2002
Ages 5-9
30 pages

There is an all-star jazz band in heaven. Miles Davis plays his trumpet, Mingus plays bass, Duke Ellington writes the songs, and more. Fly on the wings of angels and stand on the shoulders of jazz giants in this great book with 3-D illustrations sure to charm the children! - KD

Here Comes the Night
Anne Rockwell
Henry Holt & Company
Pub. Date: May 2006
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
32pp

Summation: This is the story of how one little boy goes to bed. He brushes his teeth and reads a good night story. He looks outside his window and sees the dark of the night with the moon and the stars. He and his dog spot the neighbor’s cat. The little boy says, “Shhh”, to everything he sees and climbs in bed with this teddy and truck.

Comments: I’m not sure what the author had in mind when she wrote this book. There isn’t any rhyming or theme in the story. It uses small words to explain what happens when the boy goes to bed. The illustrations didn’t add anything to the book, either. The vague outlines and smearing of colors looks like a small child colored the pages. A possibility to read to small children, but elementary readers and preschoolers may not enjoy it as well. - KP

The Hickory Chair
Written by Lisa Rowe Fraustino
Illustrated by Benny Andrews
February 2001
Reading Level: 4-8 years

Louis, the youngest grandchild loves spending Sundays at his gran’s house and playing hide and seek. He can always find Gran, even though he was born blind because she smells of lilac and bleach. Their favorite place to sit is in her old chair of hickory. Sadly Gran dies and instead of leaving a will she leaves notes hidden all over her house, wherever each one is found tells who gets that item. The search begins and everyone finds notes in the item they get to keep, all except Louis, who has no note at all. They search high and low but no one can find it, it seems Gran has forgotten him. Finally they all decide Louis can just pick what he wants, and of course he picks the history chair. When Louis grows very old, he finds his own youngest grandchild with a note in her hand, “to my favorite youngest grandchild with the blind sight.” It seems Gran didn’t forget him after all.

This is a wonderful story of how special family is and brings to mind a lot of memories I have with my own Grandparents. It’s very heartwarming and will mean something different and special to everyone that reads it. - KW

Hope
Isabell Monk; Illustrator: Janice Lee Porter
Lerner Publishing Group
Pub. Date: March 1999
Age Range: 5 to 8

Summation: Hope is the story of how one young girl, from a mixed family, comes to know how special she is. She goes to stay with her Aunt Poogee for a weekend every summer. One summer, they meet her Aunt Poogee’s friend in the marketplace. She asks if Hope is “mixed”. Aunt Poogee tells Hope a bedtime story that night, explaining to her the generations of faith and love that went into her. At the end of the book it is revealed to the reader that the girl’s name is Hope.

Comments: This book tells a wonderful story of how love between a girl and her aunt. The underlying theme is one of acceptance towards different races. It teaches small children a lesson that people are more than they may be on the outside, and to accept others of a different color. The illustrations are beautiful and I would recommend this book to early elementary readers. - KP

Horace and Morris but Mostly Dolores
By James Howe Illustrated by Amy Walrod
Ages 4-8
Copyright 2003
32 pages

A boy’s only club separates three friends, Horace, Morris, and Dolores. Horace and Morris join the “Mega-Mice, No Girls Allowed” club leaving Dolores no choice but to join “The Cheese Puffs, No Boys Allowed” club. The segregation of boys and girls is overcome by the friendship that the trio shares. In the end they meet new friends who feel the same way about silly segregated clubs. They go back to hanging out and having adventures and not worrying about what other little mice are doing. This book can help children see that boys and girls can be friends. There should not be stereotypes of what activities boys do and what activities girls do. Boys and girls can have fun exploring and going on adventures.

Horace the Horrible: A Knight Meets His Match
Written by Jackie French Koller
Illustrated by Jackie Urbanovic
January 2003
Reading Level: 3-6 years

Because her father the King is sick, Princess Minuette is sent to stay with her Uncle Horace, who knows nothing about a little girl. He spends his days slaying dragons, defeating armies and rescuing damsels in distress. Horace soon finds out that no of his normal tasks are very easy with a little girl around, especially one who misses her father so much. Princess Minuette finally breaks down Horace and helps him to realize that maybe he isn’t so horrible after all.

With a lot of great illustrations this is a fun book to read and has a great surprise ending when we learn that Horace the Horrible isn’t as tough as he seems.

Horton Hatches the Egg
Author: Dr. Seuss
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: October 1940
Age Range: 4 to 8
64pp

Horton the Elephant walks by Mayzie, a lazy bird who is sitting on her egg. She asks him if he would sit on her egg because she needs a rest and a vacation. Horton hesitantly agrees and he climbs up the tree to sit on the egg. He sits and he sits and he sits and he sits. Mayzie does not come back. He sits through storms and freezing snows. One day some hunters come and they almost shoot Horton, but then they decided that this is a fascinating sight – an elephant sitting on an egg in a tree – and they take him to New York to sell him to the circus. The circus makes it to a city not too far from Mayzie and she goes to see what she could see. She sees Horton and as he gets up to let her have the egg, the egg begins to crack. Out pops a tiny little elephant just like Horton but with wings. Horton finally is able to return home and he takes the little baby with him. - JH

How Do Dinosaurs Clean Their Rooms?
Jane Yolen & Mark Teague
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: August 2004
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
12pp

Reading Notes: This is a cute book teaching children how to clean up their room. The parents are asking throughout the book how a dinosaur does or does not clean up his room. At the end the dinosaur’s room is spotless! - RC

How I Became a Pirate
Melinda Long; Illustrated by: David Shannon
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 2003
Age Range: 4 to 8
44pp

How does one become a pirate? Well start digging and start making a sand castle and wait for a pirate ship to land with pirates looking for a good digger to help bury their treasure. Once on board learn about pirate manners while dinning (lack there of) and their lack of bedtime. Just make sure to be back in time for soccer practice.

How to Bake an American Pie
Written by Karma Wilson
Illustrated by Raul Colon
May, 2007
Reading Level: 5-8 years

To bake an American Pie (first ever made on the fourth of July), you must heat the world and stick in a large melting pot. Then it’s time to add in the ingredients, shining seas, amber waves of grain, mountain, plains, rivers and streams. Don’t forget people from every way and walk of life, add in plenty of faith, hope and love and other things that can only be borrowed from heaven. Add some forgiveness and plenty of care then place it in God’s grace and allow it to rise. It will serve just as many who wish to stop by.

This book was a lot of fun to read, because it had great rhythm and flow. It shows how important each ingredient is to make America great and teaches a great moral about making room for everyone and everything. The illustrations a beautiful and include several full page pictures. After reading this book, I’m proud to be an American! - KW

How to Lose All Your Friends
Nancy Carlson
January 1994
Ages: 4-6

This book is a secret recipe on how to make sure you don’t have any friends. So, if you don’t want any, read this book and follow the instructions carefully. The book will tell you how to get rid of your friends by bullying, being selfish, tattling, and whining! In the end, you will find that you have everything to yourself and nobody to share it with. Read this book to find out how not to have any friends. - AM

I Have Heard of a Land
Joyce Carol Thomas; Illustrated by: : Floyd Cooper
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: January 2000
Age Range: 7 to 11
32pp

This story tells of the westward movement to Oklahoma. A young woman makes her way west, dreaming of the land she can call her own and the beauty that she will see. She will grow her own food and her neighbors will help her build her very own house. She will live through horrible winters and love the beauty and harvest of the summer. Everything she has will be her own and the land will stretch as far as her eyes can see. - JH

I Lost My Bear
Jules Feiffer
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: August 2000
Age Range: 5 to 7
40pp

Summation: A little girl loses her favorite teddy bear and goes on a hunt to find it. She tries to recruit her mom to help her, but mom’s busy and tells her to be a detective. Dad won’t help her and neither will her sister. She decides to throw one of her other animals, to help her find her bear. Her sister gives her one of her animals, so the little girl won’t have to lose another one. She throws the stuffed animal and finds all sorts of things that were lost. When bedtime comes, the little girl finds her bear in her bed.

Comments: This is a great book for small children. They would be able to relate to the little girl and her problem. Preschool through elementary would enjoy this book. The part where she thinks she will never see her bear again is a gray page. The little girl learns a good lesson about not giving up. - KP

I Love You, Little Monkey
Written by Alan Durant, Illustrated by Katharine McEwen
Ages 3-6.
Copyright 2007.
32 pages.

When you are little you hate to be ignored, especially when you want someone to play with you! In this story Little Monkey keeps asking Big Monkey to do things with him. Big Monkey is too busy with chores to play with Little Monkey and tells Little Monkey to go play by himself. While Little Monkey goes to play on his own, he ends up undoing the chores Big Monkey completes. Big Monkey gets upset and sends Little Monkey to his bed. Little Monkey feels horrible and cries to Big Monkey and says, “You don’t love me.” Big Monkey explains to Little Monkey that he still loves him even when he’s naughty. I believe this story would be great for young children because they can relate to the storyline. The illustrations in this book were cute and had fun, silly little details.

I Stink! (2002)
Written and Illustrated by Kate and Jim McMullan
2002
Ages 4 - 7

When all of the city goes to sleep, the garbage truck comes to life. He eats garbage fro breakfast, lunch, and dinner. When he gets too full, he burps and out comes alphabet soup. Finally, after the garbage truck is all done, he dumps it onto the barge to be whisked away to the garbage factory. Then he starts again. – KD

I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato
Lauren Child
Copyright 2003
Ages 4-6

Charlie has to watch her sister Lola and feed her dinner. This poses a problem because Lola is a fussy eater! Lola will not eat “peas, carrots, potatoes, mushrooms, spaghetti, eggs, sausages, cauliflower, cabbage, baked beans, bananas, oranges, apples, rice, cheese, fish sticks, and will never not ever eat a tomato”. However, Charlie has a plan to get Lola to eat some new and different foods. - AP

I Wish My Brother Was a Dog
Written by Carol Diggory Shields; Illustrated by Paul Meisel
1999
Ages 5-8  

Andy has a big brother, whose older brother wishes Andy was a dog. If he were a dog, Andy would not be messing with his older brothers toys, he would not be up crying all night, and things would just be better. Dogs can do tricks, they have their own toys, and they are more peaceful than babies. In the end, after all the imagining is over, Andy’s older brother realizes that Andy is exactly what he needs. He’s a little brother. – KD

If You Give Mouse a Cookie
Laura Numeroff,; Illustrated by: Felicia Bond
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: October 1996
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

What happens when you give a mouse a cookie? Will he want a glass of milk to go with it? Will he want to clean himself up afterward and end up cleaning your entire house? What else will he want or do? Find out what can happen when from one little cookie in this sweet little tale. - AP

A little boy is sitting outside and sees a mouse. He offers the mouse a cookie. The mouse takes the cookie and then he asks for a glass of milk. He asks for a straw to go along with his chocolate milk. The mouse continues to ask for things and be reminded of things, finally ending with another glass of milk and another cookie. - JH

If You Give a Pig a Party
Laura Numeroff, Illustrated by Felicia Bond
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: September 2005
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

When you give a pig a party will she want balloons? Will she put on her favorite party dress? Will you have to track down all her friends? Will she want to have them sleepover and start a pillow fight? Find out what can happen from just one little balloon. - AP

Imogene’s Antlers
David Small
Copyright 1988
Ages 6-9

 Imogene awakes one morning to find she has grown antlers! Undeterred Imogene sets about her day. The house staff thinks she is just darling, however the same can not be said by her mother who faints every time Imogene walks into the room. Will Imogene ever get rid of her antlers? - AP

I’d Really Like to Eat a Child
Sylviane Donnio
April 2007
Ages: 5-6

Cereal, pancakes, or toast? What would you eat for breakfast? Little Achilles the crocodile is tired of bananas for breakfast and decides he wants to eat a child. His parents try everything to get him to eat, but nothing will satisfy him except a child. When he takes a walk to the river he finds a little girl to eat…only he finds out he’s still too small! What’s a crocodile to do if he’s too small to eat a girl? - AM

I’m Gonna Like Me
Jamie Lee Curtis; Illustrator: Laura Cornell
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: September 2002
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Annotation : This book is about liking yourself no matter what. The children in the book like themselves whether they are right or wrong, no mater what they look like, and no matter what they are doing. They are committed to liking themselves under any circumstance.

Reaction : This story was very positive. I recommend it as a good introduction to studies in self esteem in the early grades. - EH

The Invisible Moose
Dennis Haseley; Illustrator: Steven Kellogg
Penguin Group
Pub. Date: January 2008
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

Annotation : This story is about a boy moose who falls in love with the most beautiful girl moose in the forest. He loves her not just because of her beauty, but because of her heart. When she is kidnapped by Steel McSteal, Moose seeks the help of Owl McFowl to get to New York City to rescue his love. Owl gives the moose a potion to make him invisible, along with directions to New York City and an extra bottle of the potion just in case it wears off. Moose travels to New York City in search of his love. He finally finds her locked in a cage. She drinks the remaining potion in order to become invisible and trick her captor. The two head back from the cell in New York City to Canada.

Reaction : This cute, innocent love story was wonderful. Even animals have knights in shining armour. - EH

If You Give a Cat a Cupcake
Laura Numeroff; Illustrator: Felicia Bond
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 2008
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

Annotation : In this book, we see all of the things that can happen if you give a cat a cupcake. One small cupcake can lead to fun at the beach, excitement in the gym, rest at the lake, adventures in the science museum, and a ride on a merry-go-round. Eventually, the cat ends up back home where he started, with sprinkles and a cupcake.

Reaction : Cute story—very simple and well illustrated. - EH

Jabber Wocky
Christopher Myers
September 2007
Ages: 9 and Up

Jabber Wocky is a story with silly words. Imagine what is happening on this playground as you read the silly words. Look at the pictures and imagine the story as the author sees it. Some kids playing on the playground, a boy taking on a bully in basketball, and victory to the boy! All is well and the playground is back to norm. - AM

Jackie’s Bat (2006)
Written by Marybeth Lorbiecki; Illustrated by Brian Pinkney
2006
Ages 6 - 10

Joey gets to be the batboy for the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943. 1943 is the first year that any major league coach has put an African American man on his team. At first, Joey refuses to shine Jackie Robinson’s cleats, or do for him any of the other things that Joey does for every other player on the Dodgers. Finally, as Jackie perseveres through the persecution, Joey learns a lesson in racial prejudice and discrimination. – KD

Johnny Appleseed; A Tall Tale
Retold and Illustrated by Steven Kellogg
Copyright 1988
Ages 6-9

This is a classic retelling of the tale of John Chapman a.k.a Johnny Appleseed. Who headed west to clear land and planting apple orchards. Making friends with the settler. Read this story to find out more about Johnny Appleseed and his adventures. - AP

Johnny Lion's Rubber Boots
Edith Thacher Hurd; Illustrated by: Clement Hurd
Topeka Bindary
Pub. Date: January 2001
Copyright: 1972
64 pages
Ages: 4-8

It is a rainy day. Johnny lion does not know what to do. He is very bored because mother lion will not let him go outside to play. He tries to keep himself busy by building things, painting and singing but he really just wants to go outside. But then father lion arrives home with a very special surprise, Rubber Boots!! Johnny Lion gets to go play outside and he has so much fun in his new rubber boots! - JK

Judy Moody Gets Famous
Megan McDonald; Illustrator: Peter H. Reynolds
Candlewick Press
Pub. Date: March 2003
Age Range: 6 to 10
144pp

Judy Moody had moods-- that’s for sure. And when nasty Jessica Finch gets famous for winning the spelling bee, Judy Moody surely has a mood. Determined to get famous for something, Judy tries everything! When only her elbow makes it in the newspaper, Judy gets even more moody. In the end, the very thing that Judy didn’t do to get fame just might make her famous after all. - AM

June 29, 1999
David Wiesner
Candlewick Press
Pub. Date: March 2003
September 1995
32 pp
Ages: 5-8

Giant vegetables fill the sky! Giant eggplant, tomatoes, potatoes, and every other vegetable you can think are landing on Earth. Holly Evans is more convinced than ever that these vegetables are the ones she sent in space as an experiment to see what extraterrestrial influence space would have on her plants. Then, vegetables not in Holly’s experiment begin to appear on Earth. Holly has two questions: where did these vegetables come from and what happened to hers? - AM

Just Like Josh Gibson
Angela Johnson
January 2007
Ages: 5-7

Grandmama could hit, catch, and throw a baseball better than any boy in her neighborhood—as good as Josh Gibson! But, Grandmama was a girl and when she was growing up, girls did NOT play baseball. Will Grandmama ever get her chance to be a star and play like Josh Gibson. - AM

Kate, the Cat and the Moon (2004)
Written by David Almond; Illustrated by Stephen Lambert
2004
Ages 4 - 8

Everyone in the house is sleeping silently, when Kate enters a wonderful dream in which she turns into a cat, running around the countryside with a fellow cat. Together, they bound along the brick walls, run over and across the hills, through the fields, and back home again to bed. - KD

Katie and the Big Snow
Virginia Lee Burton
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: April 1974
Copyright: 1943
Ages: 4-8
36pp

Katy was a wonderful tractor that could do many different things. Katy worked for the highway department of the city of Geoppolis. Katy got to do all sorts of jobs and loved to save the day! When winter came Katy had to stay home because there was not a lot of snow and Katy was a very big and strong tractor. But a big snow came and the city was snowed in, even the snow plows would not work. Katy started rescuing everyone in the city. Katy saved the day in the city and dug everyone out! - JK

Kevin and His Dad
Irene Smalls; Illustrated by: Michael Hays
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Pub. Date: April 1999
Age Range: 4 to 6
32pp

A young boy’s mother is gone for a time, so he is able to spend some time with his dad. First, they have to work. They clean the whole house and do the dishes and the laundry. They even dust the dog. Then they go to the park to play baseball. They go to a movie and then to a restaurant to have a snack. They finally make their way home, being silly and racing, and then being calmer and walking quietly. - JH

King Puck
Michael Garland
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: January 2007
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Annotation : Seamus and his goat Finny live alone on a mountain in Ireland. The two enjoy spending time together, but with no other people nearby, Seamus is lonely. Most of his time is spent talking and reading Finn MacCool stories. His desire is to have more books and someone to talk to. One night, the fairies that live around Seamus hear his plight. Using their magic, they put a spell on Finney which enables him to talk. It is this new gift that wins Finny the title “King Puck” (King of Ireland for a day) and the opportunity to ask the mayor for one thing. Finny asks for books, since he was aware that Seamus really wanted them. The two live happily-ever-after on their mountain; talking, enjoying each other’s company, and reading books.

Reaction : This was a heartwarming, fun story. Emphasizes the bond between people and pets. - EH

The Kissing Hand
Audrey Penn
Tanglewood Press IN
Pub. Date: September 2006
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

The Kissing Hand written by Audrey Penn is and adorable story about a young raccoon, Chester, who is preparing for his very first day of raccoon school. Just like most students that might read this story, Chester is experiencing a little bit of anxiety about being away from his mother for so long. To help him build the courage to spend the whole day at school, Chester's mommy teaches him a little trick. She gently kissed the inside of his hand, making a "kissing hand". She told him that whenever he starts to get homesick, all he needed to do was press his had to his cheek and it would be just as if she were giving him a kiss. This book is very sweet and should be read by any student that is having separation anxieties. - KH

Knuffle Bunny
Mo Williams
Hyperion
Pub. Date: September 2004
Age Range: 3 to 6
40pp

Summation: The tale of baby’s first words unfolds in this tale of parent/child miscommunication. Daddy and Trixie go to the Laundromat, but Snuffle Bunny is forgotten there. Trixie tries to tell Daddy all the way home, but was unsuccessful. They arrive home, and Mommy asks Daddy where Knuffle Bunny is. They all run back to the Laundromat where, upon some serious searching, Dad finds the stuffed animal in the laundry. Trixie speaks her first word, “Knuffle Bunny”.

Comments: This story is adorable. With very few words and mixed coloring illustrations, the book is short and fun to look at. I recommend this book be read to preschoolers. I enjoyed it myself and will read it again. - KP

Let George Do it!
George Foreman; Illustrated by Fran Manushkin
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: April 2005
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

George has five sons, George, George, George, George and George. But today is big George’s birthday and mother needs everyone’s help. George vacuums the floor, George cleans the baby, George does the dishes and George brings down more chairs for the party. With this many George’s things can be very confusing and most of the jobs get messed up or done more than once. But finally the party is ready to start and Big George is very thankful for everything his little Georges did to celebrate with him.

George Forman brings to life his own family and his five sons all named George in this book about their crazy household all preparing for a party. It’s a lot of fun to see what everyone is doing and to see if you can keep up with each George as he goes throughout his day. This book would be a great read for any family. - KW

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse
Kevin Henkes
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: August 1996
Age Range: 4 to 7
40pp

Lilly loves everything about school from the pointy pencils to the fish sticks and chocolate milk on Friday at lunch, and most of all Lilly loves her teacher. Then one day Lilly brings her new purple plastic purse to class and cannot wait to show it to the class. Lilly’s teacher ends up taking her purse away causing Lilly to draw and unflattering picture of him, but at the end of the day when Lilly gets her purse back with a kindly note from her teacher. This makes Lilly feel just awful. What will Lilly do? - AP

*****

There are many types of children in this world, some shy, some not-so-shy, some quiet, some loud, some who would love nothing better than to be the center of attention, and some who would just assume sit in the back comer of the class. Lilly's Purple Plastic Purse, by Kevin Henkes, is the story of a little mouse names Lilly, who loves school, and loves to learn, but also feels that she needs to be the center of that learning for the whole classes sake. In school, there are schedules that teachers need to stick to, as Lilly learns when she is so anxious to give her show and tell that she interrupts the lesson. When her usually favorite teacher calls her out on this, she becomes very angry at him and makes a rash decision to write him a nasty note. Lilly has to learn how to apologize and ask for forgiveness from the teacher. - KH

Little Bear
Else Holmelund Minarik; Illustrated by: Maurice Sendak
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: January 1957
Age Range: 4 to 8
64pp

This book follows the adventures of little bear in four short stories. In “What will little bear wear?” Little Bear figures out what he should wear in the cold. Little bear thinks he needs a whole bunch of outwear when really he is wearing his fur coat! In “Birthday Soup” Little bear thinks his mother has forgotten it is his birthday. He decides to make birthday soup for his friends since he sees no birthday cake but mother surprises him with a beautiful birthday cake! In “Little Bear goes to the Moon” Little bear imagines how he could fly to the moon and tries to. He realizes that he wants to stay on earth and be with his mother bear. In “Little Bear’s Wish” Little bear wishes that he could be and do all kinds of different things! Mother reminds him about some things about himself and little bear cuddles in to go to sleep! - JK

Little Bear's Surprise
Kathleen Allen Meyer; Illustrated by: Carol Boerke
Journey Books (SC)
Pub. Date: January 1999
32pp

Little Bear's Surprise is an endearing children's book written by Kathleen Allen Meyer, and Illustrated by Carol Boerke. It is a tale that not only warms your heart, it also teaches children that they are never too little to make a difference. As Little Bear faces the challenge of being the youngest of three bear cubs, he struggles with not being able to do the things that his older brother bears can do. This is something that not only children that are the youngest in their families, but every child that has ever been told that they cannot do something because they are too young, has faced. Little Bear discovers that although he might not be able to do exactly what his older brother bears can do, with a little creativity he can do something just as good. - KH

Little Bunny’s Bath Time
Jane Johnson; Illustrator: Gaby Hansen
ME Media, LLC
Pub. Date: September 2004
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

Summation: It is bath time in the bunny house. Mother bunny puts all the bunnies in the tub expect for Little Bunny, because he wants to keep playing. The bunnies have fun playing in the bathtub and Little Bunny wants to play, too. Little Bunny tries to get his mommy’s attention but she’s busy. When all the other bunnies are clean, Little Bunny tries to get in the tub and falls in. Mommy bunny gives him a bath. The other little bunnies get dirty again, but not Little Bunny!

Comments: This book is fun to read to small children. I would let early elementary students read it on their own. There are very few words on each page and the pictures are bright and colorful. This is a great book for parents to read to their small children. - KP

The Little House
Virginia Lee Burton
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: April 1978
Age Range: 5 to 8
44pp

A man builds a little pink house out in the country. He does not want the house to ever be sold but to stay in the family forever. The little house watches the sun and moon rise, and she sees the changing of the seasons. At night she can see the glow of the city and she wonders what it would be like to live there. One day, some trucks come and build a road. Suddenly, the roads are busier. The city slowly builds up around the little house. No one lives in her anymore, and she is sat and breaking down on the outside, living in the shadows of two skyscrapers and an elevated train line. Finally, one day, the man’s great-great-granddaughter sees the house and recognizes it. She moves it out to the country, and her family lives there. The little house is happy to be back where she belongs and never again wonders what the city is like. - JH

The Little Red Hen
Miller
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: February 2001
24pp

This favorite folktale is the story of the little red hen as she plants her grain of wheat. She asks for help from her friends the duck, goose, cat and pig but none of her friends will help her. Her wheat grows with still no help from her friends. The little red hen reaps the grain by herself, takes it to the mill by herself, kneads the flour into dough by herself and bakes the bread by herself. But when it comes time to eat the bread all her friends want to help. The little red hen eats all the bread by herself. This is a good teaching tool to help children learn the importance of helping and hard work. - JK

Lon Po Po A Red-Riding Hood Story from China
Translated and illustrated by Ed Young
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: April 1996
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

A twist on the tale of Red Riding Hood, the mother goes to visit the grandmother (Po Po). Leaving three young children with a cunning wolf waiting to pounce. Can Shang, Tao, and Paotze out smart this wolf. - AP

Lots of Dads
Written by Shelley Rotner and Sheila M. Kelly Photographs by Shelley Rotner
Dial Books for Young Readers
Pub. Date: May 1997
Age Range: 5 to 6
24pp

What is a Dad like? What do they do? This book has wonderful descriptions and photographs that portray what a good father can be like. A father that plays with his children, helps his children and works hard. The book has many different photographs of fathers to represent many different nationalities. I enjoyed all the photographs and I believe that children would enjoy them as well. - FT

Lots of Moms
Written by Shelley Rotner and Sheila M. Kelly Photographs by Shelley Rotner
Ages 5-6
Copyright 1996
24 pages

Every mom is unique. But all good mothers share the similar qualities. They teach, they play, and they smile and hug. This story describes different activities that mothers engaged in with there children. This book includes beautiful photographs of mothers with their children. It includes diversity in the people photographed as well. It is a wonderful summary of what being a mother is all about. - FT

Louisa May and Mr. Thoreau’s Flute
Written by Julie Dunlap and Marybeth Lorbiecki, Illustrated by Mary Azarian
Ages 5-up
Copyright 2002
32 pages.

Louy is a rambunctious young girl who desperately wants to please her father. She loves her interesting and strange teacher Mr. Thoreau. Louy enjoys the sweet melodies of Mr. Thoreau’s wooden flute as they go on outdoor fieldtrips. Mr. Thoreau’s stories of elves and fairies spark the imaginative side of Louy’s mind. Louy’s family needs her to stay at home and help with chores because her family is struggling financially. She is not allowed to go on the Saturday field trips that Mr. Thoreau takes his students on. Even though Louy is forced to stay at home, Mr. Thoreau’s music inspires her to write her first poem! It was interesting learning a little about what Louisa May Alcott’s childhood. I appreciated the author’s prologue and afterword that provided historical information on both Louisa and Mr. Thoreau. - FT

Louise, The Adventures of a Chicken

Author : Kate DiCamillo Illustrator: Harry Bliss
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 2008
Age Range: 4 to 8
56pp

Annotation : Louise was a chicken who longed for adventure. This book recounts her adventures. In Louise’s first journey, she finds herself at sea. When the ship is overtaken by pirates, Louise is captured and plans are made for how she should be cooked. A storm rises, washing everyone, including Louise, overboard. She paddles to shore on a piece of wood from the ship. Back on land, Louise finds her way home to her henhouse where she rests from her exciting adventure. Next, Louise joins a circus high-wire act. This adventure gets a little bit boring—until the lion escapes! The shock of the escaped lion causes Louise to fall from the high-wire straight toward the open mouth of the hungry lion. Using her wings to flap away, Louise escapes impending death under the hat of a circus clown. Finally, Louise travels to a far away place where a fortune-teller informs her that she will meet a dark stranger. Louise was then kidnapped by this dark stranger and placed in a cage with lots of other hens who did not seem to be bothered at all by the fact that they were being held captive. Louise works to set them all free. After they escape the cage, Louise longs to be back at home in the henhouse. She returns to her coop and tells all the other hens of her adventures.

Reaction : This story was very gripping even with a hen as the main character. It was very fun to read. - EH

Luck
Jean Craighead George; Illustrator: Wendell Minor
Live Oak Media
Pub. Date: February 2007
Ages: 4-7

Annotation : This story tells the journey away from and back home for a young sandhill crane named Luck. He was given this name by the young girl who rescued him because he had survived having his neck stuck in the plastic ring from a 6-pack of soda. When it was time to migrate north from Nebraska, Luck and his parents journey across many states and highways, and he makes note of a variety of things that capture his attention along the way. At the appropriate time, Luck leaves his parents and finds a mate of his own: her name is Wise. Together, Luck and Wise travel back to Luck’s Nebraska home and to the girl who saved him. There they start their own family.

Reaction : I enjoyed the fun manner in which the author presents the story of the sandhill crane migration. It was easy to read and had wonderful pictures. - EH

Madeline
Ludwig Bemelmans
Copyright: 1939
54 pages
Ages: 4-8

This book is a story of a little girl named Madeline who lived at a big house in Paris with eleven other girls and Miss Clavel. Madeline was the smallest of them all but she was the most adventurous! Miss Clavel awakes one night and realizes “something is not right”. Something is not right, Madeline is sick. The doctor comes and Madeline is whisked away in an ambulance. Madeline has appendicitis and she has to have surgery. She has to stay in the hospital and the other girls come and visit her there. Madeline likes to show off her scar from the surgery. The other girls go home but miss Madeline so much! They decide they want to have their appendix out too because of all the attention that Madeline got but Miss Clavel is very thankful that they are all well! - JK

Madeline's Christmas

Ludwig Bemelmans
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: September 2000
Age Range: 3 to 8
32pp

Madeline lives with eleven other little girls and their teacher, Miss Clavel. It is Christmas time, and all of the little girls – and Miss Clavel – are ill except for Madeline. A rug merchant comes to the door, and Madeline buys all of his rugs to put at the beds of every girl to keep their feet warm when they step out of bed in the morning. The rug merchant leaves, but he is cold and goes back to the girls’ house to get his rugs. Madeline invites him in to warm up. He says some magic words, and all of the little girls find themselves at their own homes to spend Christmas with their families. They all return to the house to celebrate New Year’s. - JH

The Magic School Bus at the Waterworks
Joanna Cole; Illustrated by: Bruce Degen
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: March 1988
40pp
Ages 5-11

Mrs. Frizzle is the craziest teacher at school. She takes her students on the craziest field trips. In this book, the bus flies up into the clouds, the children ride back to earth in raindrops, float down a river on the mountainside, shoot through a reservoir, and fly out through the school faucets. Join Mrs. Frizzle and the gang on one of their infamous crazy field trips! - KD

The Magic School Bus: In the Time of Dinosaurs
Joanna Cole ; Illustrated by: Bruce Degen
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: August 1995
48pp
Reading Level: 6-9 years

It was visitor’s day at school and the classroom was decorated like Dinosaur Land and filled with all kinds of dinosaurs, but true to her form, crazy Ms. Fizzle decided to take a field trip instead. The students climbed on the Magic School Bus and head to an archeological dig, but Ms. Fizzle got another idea and they all hopped back on the bus to look for Maiasaura eggs. Of course the only way to do that is to travel back in time! After a couple of stops in the Late Triassic Period, the Late Jurassic Period, the Late Cretaceous Period, and they finally found what they were looking for, they always witnessed the end of the Age of Dinosaurs. They students finally made it back to the present era, just in time to show all that they had learned to their visitors.

This book series is great at jump starting children’s imaginations and taking them right in the middle of what they are learning. Each page also has lots of extra facts about dinosaurs, what they ate and how they lived. It has some great illustrations and tells a fun story at the same time that it teaches. - KW

The Magic Schoolbus Inside the Human Body
Joanna Cole; Illustrated by: Bruce Degen
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: October 1990
40pp
Ages 4-8

Ms. Frizzle is the strangest teacher these students have ever had. What started as an innocent science experiment and field trip to a museum ended up being a big adventure! The students ride their magic bus on a trip through the human body. They see how our bodies use food to make energy. This is a good book to get children interested in science without them knowing it! With wonderful illustrations this book helps students get a grasp on this science concept and help visualize what our bodies look like. - JK

Mama, do you love me?
Written by Barbara M. Joosse
Illustrated by Barbara Lavallee
June 1991
Reading Level: 5-6 Years

Mama, do you love me? Yes dear, very much. Every where the little girl and her mother travel and in everything that they do, the little girl just wants to know if her mother loves her. The answer is always the same, yes. Life is tough in the arctic, but with the unconditional love of her mother, things seem to be a little bit better for this young girl, no matter what happens.

This book is very popular, and it’s easy to see why, it has a universal story line of unconditional love between mother and daughter. With great illustrations and a heartwarming message, it’s easy to come back to this book over and over again. - KW

Mama’s Saris
Written by Pooja Makhijani Illustrated by Elena Gomez
Ages 6-9
Copyright 2007
32 pages.

Young girls from many different cultures love to play dress up with their mother’s grown-up clothing. In Mama’s Saris a young Indian girl helps her mother go through all the different saris. Her mother must pick out one to wear to her daughters birthday party. The girl describes the different occasions that her mother has worn the saris to in the past. In the end the little girl gets to wear her first sari! This story gives you a look into Indian culture and includes some Hindu words. The illustrations are remarkable and rich in color. - FT

Martha Calling
Susan Meddaugh
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: August 1996
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Summation: Martha is an amazing dog who can talk after she eats alphabet soup. Martha talks on the telephone and wins a vacation. Martha is sad because no dogs are allowed at the hotel. Her family dresses her up as an old woman and calls her their grandmother and takes Martha with them. The hotel guests find out that Martha is a dog and Martha tells them how unfair it is that dogs are never allowed places. The hotel becomes pet friendly and everyone brings their pets with them on vacation after that.

Comments: Marth Calling is a story about treating dogs with respect. The pictures are very intricate, with lots of word bubbles. There are a lot of words, so this would be a good elementary book for older kids. There’s a great moral and a good message presented. - KP

Me, All Alone, at the End of the World
M.T. Anderson
September 2005
Ages: 6-10

A young boy lives all by himself at the very tip of the world. He plays ball, goes on treasure hunts, and discovers all sorts of things, all by himself. Until one day when an old visionary finds him and turns the end of the world into a tourist attraction. Read about the young boy’s new adventures and the friends he finds and what happens when the end of the world is just like every other place. - AM

Mice and Beans
Pam Munoz Ryan
August 2001
Ages: 4-7

Little Catalina’s seventh birthday is coming soon and her Grandma Rosa Maria is so excited to plan one of her big parties with her big family in her little casita (home). Rosa Maria always said, “When there’s room in the heart, there’s room in the house, except for a mouse.” As she continues to plan her youngest grandchild’s birthday fiesta complete with a cake and candles, piñata, and a big meal of rice and beans, things seem to be disappearing…will Rosa Maria’s big heart and small house have room for a mouse? - AM

Midnight Snowman
Written by Caroline Feller Bauer; Illustrated by Catherine Stock
1987
Ages 7 - 10

It has never snowed in this town. It rains a lot, but it has never snowed. One night, snow finally graces the small town. Everyone is so excited that they team up to make the biggest snowman ever known to man! – KD

Miss Nelson is Back
Harry G. Allard and James Marshall
Copyright 1982
Ages 5-8

When Miss Nelson announces that she will not be in school for a next week, her students have visions of acting up and doing all sorts of things. That is until an older student puts the fear of Viola Swamp into the class! The meanest substitute “a real which”, according to the older student. Will Miss Nelson’s class get the Swamp? - AP

Miss Spider’s Tea Party
David Kirk
Copyright 1994
Ages 3-6

Miss Spider is a very lonely spider! She makes tea and cakes everyday in hopes of someone coming by. However, none of the other bugs join her for fear of being eaten. Then one day when a cold wet moth happens by Miss Spider’s home she has a chance to show her kindness and put all the other bugs fears to rest once and for all. - AP

The Mitten
Adapted from the Ukranian folktale and Illustrated by Jan Brett
1989
Ages 5- 10

Nicki wants pure white mittens with which to play outside in the snow. Baba finally concedes, and Nicki runs around like any young boy should. Nicki unwittingly loses his mitten, just as Baba thought he would. Various animals, on the other hand, find his mitten – they find it a great place to burrow. When he realizes he lost his mitten, he runs back to find it all stretched out. Baba is still pleased, though, when she sees that Nicki still has his new mittens. – KD

The Mitten: A Ukrainian Folktale
Adapted and illustrated by Jan Brett
Copyright 1989
Ages 4 - 8

Nicki wants a pair of mittens as white as the winter snow. His Baba (Grandmother) agrees to knit them but is convinced that he will loose them in the snow, and sure enough the first day Nicki has his new mittens he loses one of them. The first is a mole that climbs in for warmth, next a rabbit then a hedgehog. Gradually more animals climb into the mitten each one a bit larger than the last. The largest being a bear and finally a mouse finds a space on top of the bear’s nose, where her whiskers cause the bear to sneeze. Causing the animals and the mitten to go flying, just in time for Nicki to find it and return home. AP

Moonlight Kite
Helen Buckly; Illustrator: Elise Primavera
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: March 1997
Age Range: 5 to 7
30pp

Annotation : Moonlight Kite is the story of three monks—Brother Blaise, Brother Carlos, and Brother Andre—who are the only three monks left at the monastery in which they live. The three live and work together but do not speak to one another because of the vow of silence that they have taken. In spite of their vow, they miss the interactions that they had with the townspeople, particularly the children. One afternoon, Anarilla and Nicholas come up the hill to fly a kite. Their kite, unfortunately, gets stuck in a tree, so the children have to leave it there overnight. Their plan is to return to get the kite the next day. During the night, the monks retrieve the kite from the tree, fly it, and put it in a smaller tree that the children can get to more easily. The next day, Ana suspects that the monks had flown the kite, but her brother disagrees. Nevertheless, the children leave the kite for the monks to fly another night. This time, Brother Carlos makes a blue one for the children. The monks fly the kites by night, and, eventually, more children come and fly kites by day. The Brothers enjoy listening to the sound of the children playing.

Reaction : This was a very fun story, the illustrations were simple yet effective. I enjoyed the read. - EH

Mrs. Huggins and her Hen Hannah
Written and Illustrated by Lydia Dabcovich
September 1986
Reading Level: 5-7 years

Mrs. Huggins loved her hen, Hannah and they did everything together. They cooked and cleaned, did the laundry, planted the garden and picked the apples, and took care of the farm animals. At night they relaxed by the fire and did the mending. One day Hannah grew sick and eventually died, Mrs. Huggins buried her in the green pasture. The cottage was very lonely without Hannah, until one day Mrs. Huggins heard a sound, she went to Hannah’s nest and there was a brand new baby chick. Now Mrs. Huggins lives with Hannah’s daughter and they do everything together.

This book is a very simple to read and quirky story. It would be a great book for beginning readers to learn with. - KW

Mrs. Katz and Tush
Patricia Polocco
Copyright 1992
Ages 4-8

Larnel’s mom visits Mrs. Katz just about every other day, which is until Larnel asks Mrs. Katz to adopt the last kitten of a litter. She agrees on the condition the Larnel comes over to help take care of Tush. Over time Larnel learns about Mrs. Katz and her culture and customs. They also develop a beautiful friendship. - AP

My Baby
Jeanette Winter
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Pub. Date: March 2001
Age Range: 3 to 6
32pp

Reading Level: 5-6 years The woman has learned to make bogolan cloth since she was a little girl growing up in Mali. She learned where the best mud comes from and the best tree to get the leaves from and where to find the whitest cloth to make bogolan for people to wear at weddings, wrap their new babies in and to travel to the promise land in. But when the rains come she will have a baby of her own and now she must make a special bogolan cloth for it. As she makes it she tells her baby all about the creatures of the earth and when her baby finally comes she welcomes it with its very own special bogolan cloth of its own. This story not only tells of the special relationship between a mother and its unborn child, but also tells a lot about the culture, nature and lifestyle of the people of Mali, Africa. It’s a very sweet story and very educational as well. - KW

My Friend Is Sad
Mo Willems
Hyperion Books for Children
Pub. Date: March 2007
Age Range: 4 to 8
64pp

It’s about an elephant that is sad so his friend tries to make him feel better by dressing up like a clown, a cowboy, and a robot. At the end of the book the pig realizes the reason why his friend the elephant is sad is because the pig wasn’t there to see all of these cool characters he saw. The pig ended the book by saying “I am here now” and they were both happy. - RC

My Mom Loves Me More Than Sushi
Filomena Gomes
Second Story Press
Pub. Date: September 2006
Age Range: 4 to 8

There are all kinds of yummy foods from around the world. In this book, a little girl learns all about foods from around the world. Places like Egypt, Morocco, France, and Italy just to name a few. These delicious foods bring a little girl and her mother together, and no matter how much they like these foods, they’ll always love each other more! - AM

My Daddy is a Pretzel
Written by Baron Baptiste; Illustrated by Sophie Fatus
2004
Ages 4 - 7

This is a book of many yoga poses parents and children can do together. This addresses the tree pose, the triangle pose, the airplane pose, the fish pose, the pretzel pose, and more. By starting with the teacher asking about what the parents do for a living, Baptiste creates a unique approach to something complicated, making it accessible to everyone. – KD

My Outrageous Friend Charlie
Written and Illustrated by Martha Alexander
1989
Ages 4-8

Jessie Mae has an outrageous friend, Charlie. Charlie can do anything. He pins the tail on the donkey, walks on stilts, rides his bike with no hands, and dives off the high dive. He is Jessie Mae’s hero. Charlie convinces Jessie that she can do anything she wants to. Jessie, then, goes on her own adventures – pulling rabbits out of her sleeve, walking on the ceiling, and leaping over fences. Finally, Jessie and Charlie go on their own adventure in a hot air balloon, traveling the world as the best of friends. – KD

My Teacher for President
Kay Winters, Illustrated by Denise Brunkus
Copyright 2004
Ages 4-8

Oliver writes a local television station telling them he would like to nominate his teacher to be president. Oliver then goes on to compare what his teacher does to that of what the president does. Such as going to meeting, acting quickly in an emergency, dealing with media, and going on tips and mentions because of all of these things she would make a great president. Oliver concludes by asking that if his teacher does become president that she not leave until the end of the school year. - AP

Oliver has a great idea! With the presidential election just around the corner, he can think of no better candidate than his teacher, Mrs. Robbins. Read along to see all of the reasons Mrs. Robbins would make one great president! - AM

The Napping House
Audrey Wood; Illustrator: Don Wood
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 2000
Age Range: 5
16pp

Summation: There is a house called the napping house. There’s a bedroom in the house where the grandmother, child, dog, cat, and mouse all take a nap on a bed together. There is a flea who lands on top of the mouse. He wakes up the mouse who in turn wakes up the cat, and so on. They all wake up in succession, the reverse order of the way they fell asleep on each other. In the end, no one is asleep in the Napping House.

Comments: The Napping House is a good book to read to small children. The rhyming and the rhythm make it an easy book for younger children to memorize and pretend to read along with you. The illustrations are very cute and memorable. It’s a great story - KP

New In Town (A Book About Shyness)
Ellen Weiss
Copyright 1983
Ages 4-7

Bean is new in town and is worried that no body will like him. So when Fozzie and Kermit go over to introduce themselves Bean runs into his house from a shyness attack! Bean’s shyness prevents him from making any new friends. All this time Bean wonders, “what if they don’t like me, and why would they want to make friends with me?” This went on for a while until one day while taking a shortcut home Bean gets stuck in a lightning storm and heads for an equipment shed for shelter. There he encounters Kermit and Fozzie. Will Bean make some new friends or will his shyness overcome him? - AP

The Night Before Halloween
Natasha Wing and illustrated by Cynthia Fisher
Copyright 1999
Ages 5-6

Do monsters, ghosts and mummies prepare for Halloween like everyone else? Yes, they do in fact it’s their favorite holiday! While children dream of costumes, candy corn and other sweet treats. These creatures of Halloween are setting up for a party and all their visitors. - AP

The Night Before Kindergarten
Natasha Wing and illustrated by Julie Durrell
Copyright 2001
Ages 5-6

The night before the first day of Kindergarten and students are getting ready. Deciding what to wear and dreaming of school supplies, and then the day comes the kids are anxious and excited about the experience. But what about the parents? - AP

No, David!
David Shannon
Copyright 1998
32 pages
Ages 3-6

Stealing cookies from the cookie jar, leaving muddy tracks on the carpet, playing baseball in the house, there are just a few of the things that David does. His mom is not so thrilled and always says, “No, David!” Even though little Davey is a disobedient boy, his mother loves him all the same. In the end she lets him now that she loves him despite his mischief. I believe the illustrations in the book are funny and engaging for students. I also like that the mother shows patience and love when her son is having problems. - FT

No Jumping On The Bed!
Written and Illustrated by Tedd Arnold
Ages 3-7
Copyright 1987
32 pages.

What would happen if you did not obey your parents? Walter found out the hard way. His father had told him that he should not jump on his bed or one day he would crash right through the wall! After his father turned out the lights and closed the door for bedtime, Walter heard his neighbor boy Delbert jumping on his bed in the room above. With that, Walter decided he should be able to jump on his bed too. After a good jump, his bed starts falling through the floor of his room in to the rooms below! Walter encounters all his different neighbors and brings them, along with their belongings, to the basement of the building. Just as he reaches the basement Walter wakes up to realize it was all a dream. He decides his dad is right and Walter is not going to jump on his bed anymore. But Delbert still has to learn the hard way… I liked the cumulative aspect of this story as the author continued to add more people and things to Walter’s descent. This story also brings out consequences for bad choices and disobedience, which is a lesson children need to learn. There are always consequences for choices. - FT

Noel
Romeo Mullen

When I was young, one of my favorite books, written by Romeo Mullen, was Noel. This book was about a Christmas bulb named noel. The little bulb was filled with happiness from the time that he was purchased in the store up until the time that he was placed on the tree. But when January second rolled around and noel was taken off the tree to be stored in the attic with all the other ornaments, he became very sad! Storage was no fun at all---he could not share his joy with anyone! But when Christmas time rolls around again, Noel is very happy to be back on the tree again. Year after year noel is brought out and placed on the tree every Christmas, giving him the opportunity to share the Christmas story with all the new ornaments just as it was shared with him. - KH

Not in the House Newton
Judith Heide Gillilans; Illustrator: Elizabeth Sayles
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: October 1995
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Annotation : This story is about a boy named Newton and his magic red crayon. Newton loved to draw, and whatever he drew would become real. Each time his drawings came to life, his mother would say “Not in the house, Newton.” Finally, he heeded her warning and flew his illustrated plane up into the sky.

Reaction : This is a must have for a primary elementary teacher. The illustrations were vivid and brought life to the reading as the crayon brought life to Newton’s drawings. - EH

Not the Piano, Mrs. Medley!
Written by Evan Levine; Illustrated by S.D. Schindler
1991
Ages 8 - 11

Mrs. Medley loves going to the beach – so does her son, Max, and their dog, Word. The problem is, Mrs. Medley is so concerned about getting everything ready to go to the beach, that it doesn’t look like they’ll ever actually get to the beach. It seems that she needs to take everything she sees – umbrellas, bongos, Monopoly, chairs, and anything else they can lift. Max is tired of loading the red wagon, and Word can hardly walk any longer. Will they ever actually get to the beach? - KD

Nothing
Jon Agee
Disney Press
Pub. Date: September 2007
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

A man who owns a antique corner store was cleaning up shop when a women came in to buy something but his store was empty so he told her he had nothing to sell. She bought her “nothing” and went on her way. The whole town wanted this “nothing” she had so supply of nothing went up. And all of the peoples “somethings” went on the town sidewalk. The antique corner store owner went and got of the people “somethings” and put it in his store. Soon people got sick of their nothing and needed something so they went and got it from the antique store. - RC

Old Cricket
Lisa Wheeler
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: April 2003
Age Range: 3 to 6
32pp

This beautifully illustrated book is the story of Old Cricket. Old Cricket wakes up in a cranky mood and doesn’t want to do any work. He’s on his way out of the house and soon finds himself making up all kinds of ailments to get himself out of work. All of a sudden he wakes up to find himself the soon lunch of an old crow. In the chase, Old Cricket soon ends up with all of the ailments he made up before. Old Cricket learns an important lesson about faking sick to get out of work in this book. - AM

Olivia
Ian Falconer
Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group
Pub. Date: October 2000
Age Range: 3 to 7
40pp

Olivia is a very energetic young girl. She can wear people out and even herself. Olivia is good at just about everything she tries. This story offers a glimpse into a typical day for Olivia. - AP

*****

Olivia is very active, she loves to try on all of her clothes, sing at the top of her lungs, laugh, draw on the wall, go to the beach, play with her little brother, not do as she’s told and simply wear her mother out. But even though she tries her mother’s patience and is a little tough to handle, her mother loves her anyway.

The series of Olivia book are a favorite of children and the unique illustrations are very attractive as well. There is also a message for naughty little children everywhere, that their parents love them anyway. - KW

Once Upon a Banana
Written by Jennifer Armstrong; Illustrated by David Small
2006
Ages 4 - 10

 In this innovative children’s book that relies heavily on pictures, one banana seems to cause a lot of trouble. Jennifer Armstrong uses various signs around town to take the reader from the original banana location with the monkey to a barber shop, a bicyclist collision, passed a shopping mall, over a speed bump, eventually landing in a huge mess of bananas. Caldecott Medal recipient David Small exhibits his tremendous skill in this illustration-heavy wacky story of actions and consequences. – KD

Once Upon a Farm
Marie Bradby
February 2002
Ages: 4-8

If you’ve ever wondered about life on a farm, this is a perfect book for you. Using rhymes, the author describes what life on the farm is like for one boy and his sister. You will get a taste of the way things are done on the farm as well as all of the fun things boys and girls get to do! This book will also bring in the sadness that takes away all of the greatness of living on a farm. Read along to discover all of the wonderful things about farm life. - AM

One Day There Was Nothing to Do
Written by Jill Creighton Illustrated by Ruth Ohi
Copyright 1990
Ages 5-7
24 pages

There are always days when children get bored. In this story three children use their imagination to turn a boring day into something extraordinary. With the help of their cooperative mother, one adventure follows. After a day full of more than enough to do it’s time for bed! The children fall asleep dreaming about there fun filled day. I like the mother in this story. She was willing to be imaginative and go along with her children’s’ stories. FT

The Ox-Cart Man
Donald Hall; Barbara Cooney
The Penguin Group
Pub. Date: January 1983
Copyright: 1979
Ages: 4-8
32 pages

This winner of the Caldecott medal for its illustrations is a wonderful story of life for a family and how they survived. In October the man filled his cart up of everything that his family had made and grown from the year. He took his cart and traveled long and far to the market. He sold everything he had brought, right down to the cart and the ox. He bought his family a few things and then walked home. His family was very happy to see him and they began the process all over again. - JK

Pancakes for Supper
Anne Isaacs
October 2006
Ages: Infants-PreK

On a trip to Whisker Creek with her family, Toby is bumped off the back of the wagon. She finds herself in the forest at the mercy of many animals. How will she ever escape? She offers to give the animals different pieces of her beautiful clothing in exchange for her safety. When all of the animals run into each other, they all begin to argue over who is the grandest of them. One big fight breaks out and all of the animals melt into a puddle beneath a maple tree. After Toby is reunited with her parents, that same maple tree makes the syrup that Toby and her family eat on their pancakes for supper. - AM

Panda Club’s Tree House
Michael Berenstain
Random House Children's Books
Pub. Date: February 1990
Age Range: 5 to 7
40pp

This book is good for beginner readers. It is colorful and very well illustrated. Read “The Panda Club’s Tree House” and take an adventure to see if Panda and his friends can find the perfect tree for their tree house. Can they find one? YES! But after the new tree house is built something is missing. What could it be? - EM

Papa, do you love me?
Written by Barbara M. Joosse ; Illustrated by Barbara Lavallee
June 2005
Reading Level: 4-8 years

Life is tough in Africa and sometimes it can be scary, there is a lot of responsibility for a little boy and all he really wants to know is if his father will always love him. So whether they are hot or thirsty without a birthright cow or too sleepy to watch the herd, nothing can measure the love of the father for the sun.

As a follow up to her very popular book, “Mama, Do you Love me?” Joosse again depicts the special relationship between parent and child. This time set in the deserts of Africa, the story is still the same and the book is just as enjoyable. - KW

Pascual and the Kitchen Angels
Written and Illustrated by Tomie De Paola
January 2006
Reading Level: 4-8 years

Papa and Mama have a very special baby boy, the angels game down to sing to him, that’s how much God loves little Pascual. All the animals love Pascual and the sheep even sing to him, so Pascual becomes a very good shepherd. Pascual decides he wants to become a friar and help feed the hungry people. Mama packs a basket of food for the friars and Pascual heads off to the monastery. The friars see all the food and ask Pascual to make supper for them, only one problem, Pascual doesn’t even know how to boil water to cook the beans! So while Pascual is praying to God to help him make some food for the friars, down fly little kitchen angels to make a wonderful feast. The friars loved the food so much, they decided Pascual would always cook for them, but poor Pascual wanted to help feed the hungry. But everyday he would pray in the kitchen and the angels would make the food. The friars became curious and snuck a peek in the kitchen, they saw all the angels and knew that Pascual was very special so they let him help feed the hungry with them and Pascual never even learned to cook a cup of beans.

Tomie De Paola tells another great story in this book about the very special Pascual. Based on the story of Pascual, the patron saint of cooks and the kitchen, this heart felt story is great for any age. KW

The Patchwork Quilt
Valerie Flournoy, pictures by Jerry Pinkney
Copyright 1985
Ages 5-9

Tanya is just getting over a cold but, cannot go outside just yet. So she goes to talk to her Grandmother and finds her working with some scraps of fabric for a patchwork quilt, so Tanya decides to help her Grandmother to make the quilt. The quilt grows to include material from old blue corduroys, an old Halloween costume, a gold dress Tanya’s mother wore at Christmas time, and much more. Then one day Tanya’s Grandmother gets very sick. So Tanya decides to help her Grandmother finish the quilt while she is on the mend. Can Tanya finish the quilt? - AP

Patrick’s Dinosaur on the Internet
Carol Carrick
September 1999
Ages: 4-8

Patrick and his brother, Hank, are on the computer looking for dinosaurs. Patrick just has to know where dinosaurs are now, but it is getting late and the boys need to get to bed. So, Patrick crawls into bed watching the screen saver on the computer. Then suddenly a dinosaur appears on his screen and says he’s about to take Patrick on an adventure. Sail through space with Patrick and go on a dinosaur adventure in this book. - AM

The Piano
William Miller
August 2004
Ages: 5-12

Tia absolutely loves music. In fact, she loves music so much it eventually leads her to a house and into an unwanted job. Through this job though, Tia learns a very important lesson in music, friendship, and seeing past social and racial boundaries. - AM

A Picture Book of Abraham Lincoln
Written by David A. Adler, Illustrated by John and Alexander Wallner
Ages 5-9
Copyright 1990
32 pages.

This biography goes through the life of Abraham Lincoln. It starts from his birth in a one-room log cabin in Kentucky to his assassination on April 14, 1865. The book talks about his family life, his marriage and his political career. The book emphasizes his views on slavery. The last page of the book gives the important dates of his life. I think this book is a good concise overview of the life of Abraham Lincoln. I think it would be a good book for children to read to learn more about his life. - FT

A Picture Book of Anne Frank
Written by David A. Adler, Illustrated by Karen Ritz
Ages 7-9
Copyright 1994

The illustrations in this book are beautifully done! From all the picture book biographies I have read by David A. Adler the illustrations in this one are by far the best. The story begins with the birth of Anne Frank, the members of her family and a description of her father. The book then discusses the history of Nazi Germany and World War II. It follows Anne and her family through the war, as they live in the secret apartment and are eventually sent off to concentration camps. The book ends discussing the horrors of the Holocaust and the impact of Anne’s Dairy. I enjoyed this book because you can connect with Anne Frank and really understand how horrible the Holocaust was for one young girl, and many others like her. I liked the fact that the book gave historical information about the time period Anne lived in. - FT

A Picture Book of Benjamin Franklin
Written by David A. Adler, Illustrated by John and Alexander Wallner
Ages 6-9
Copyright 1991
32 pages.

Benjamin Franklin was a child born into a family of seventeen children! He was full of ideas and willing to work hard as a young man. He worked at a candle shop, and then for his brother who was a printer. He continued his career in printing and moved to New York City. He married Deborah Read and they had three children. He continued to excel in printing and publishing. He did many activities to improve society including helping to set up fire and police departments, a library and a hospital. He was also into experiments and inventing. The last page of this book describes him as “a writer, scientist, inventor, and statesman.” I thought this book included many interesting facts about the life of Benjamin Franklin. I think it would be an excellent book for the classroom. - FT

A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman
Written by David A. Adler, illustrated by Samuel Byrd
Ages 7-9
Copyright 1993
29 pages

Born into slavery, Harriet Tubman had many obstacles in life to overcome. She was beat by her mistress for stealing a lump of sugar. She had to watch two of her sisters be taken away in chains to different slave owners. She was almost killed by another slave owner how was trying to stop his runaway slave. Harriet desired freedom. She fled to the North on the “Underground Railroad”. She eventually became the “Moses” of her people, as a “conductor” for the “Underground Railroad” She brought other slaves from captivity to freedom. She spent the rest of her life supporting the rights of black people and women. I enjoyed learning more about Harriet Tubman when reading about her life in this story. This book includes interesting quotes and songs from Harriet Tubman that help you understand the feelings of a black women struggling for her freedom. - FT

A Picture Book of Helen Keller
Written by David A. Adler, Illustrated by John and Alexandra Wallner
Ages 6-8
Copyright 1992
32 pages.

After an illness, the child Helen Keller was left blind and deaf. She struggled as a child to be understood and had quite the temper. After meeting Anne Mansfield Sullivan, Helen was introduced into a whole world of communication. She was able to learn sign language and to read Braille. She was so proficient at learning, that she became famous. Later on in life she became an inspiration to others that faced similar circumstances. This book shows a wonderful view of how Helen Keller overcame life’s obstacles and was able to help others. - FT

Pisgty
Mark Tague
Copyright 2007
Ages 4-8

Wendell thinks his room is just fine being the complete and total pigsty that it is. That is until the pigs start showing up and start hogging the bed and making the mess even worse. Will this prompt Wendell to clean up his room? - AP

Pink and Say
Patricia Polacco
September 1994
Ages: 9-12

Relive the story of Sheldon Russell Curtis and Pinkus Aylee in this book by Patricia Polacco. This story takes place during the Civil War. A story of a friendship between two very young soldiers that transcended the boundaries that were clearly set during this time period. Watch the story unfold as Pink rescues Sheldon, nicknamed Say, and introduces him to his mother Moe Moe Bay. Moe Moe Bay and Pink teach Say a lesson in courage and bravery that he thought he would never be able to learn. This story is sure to touch the heart of any reader, young and old. - AM

A Pocket For Corduroy
Don Freeman
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Pub. Date: March 1980
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

Summation: A little bear named Corduroy goes on a trip to the Laundromat. He gets lost there, looking for a pocket to put on his overalls. He spends the night there because the Laundromat closes before his owner, Lisa, can find him. Lisa comes back to get Corduroy the next morning. She takes him home and sews him a pocket. Inside the pocket she puts a paper w/Corduroys name on it.

Comments: This is a fun book for smaller children. It would be a good book to read with your early readers. The illustrations fill the pages with color and bring Corduroy to life. I would recommend this book for early readers. - KP

*****
Corduroy is a fun loving stuffed teddy bear that is taken with Lisa everywhere she goes. In “A Pocket for Corduroy”, Corduroy gets lost in the laundromat when he goes looking for a pocket for his overalls. He spends the whole night in the laundromat wishing he had his very own pocket. The next day, Lisa comes back to find him and he tells her that he wants a pocket. She laughed and told him that he should have just told her. “A Pocket with Corduroy”, ends with Lisa making a pocket for him and making a nametag in his pocket. - EM

The Pocketful of Nonsense
James Marshall
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: September 2003
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

“The Pocketful of Nonsense” is a fun story of rhyming and different sounds. It is mixture of very unusually nursery rhymes with a couple more familiar nursery rhymes mixed in. This book is a lot of fun to read to children of all ages. It is fun to see the kids be able to quote the more familiar nursery rhymes and listen intently on the new ones. There will be laughs and giggles as you read this book to your classroom or your own kids. - EM

Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?
Written by Bill Martin, Jr.; Illustrated by Eric Carle
1991
Ages 4 - 7

Bill Martin walks his reader through a picture book where animal sounds are identified. Lions roar, hippopotami snort, flamingos flute, and more. The book comes to an end when children are in a zoo making noises just like the animals. – KD

Potato: A Tale from the Great Depression
Kate Lied

Summation: The story is told about a family during the depression, from the stories told to a granddaughter. She tells the story of her grandparents life during the depression. They work at a coal mine when her grandpa lost his job and the bank took away their jobs and move to Idaho to pick potatoes. They take potatoes home with them and use them as money to make it through the depression. The little girl says that is why is fond of potatoes.

Comments: This is a great story for early readers, or to read to preschoolers. There are few words on each page and the pictures are big and bright. It tells a great story of how life might have been for families living during the depression. - KP

Pretzel
Written by: Margret Rey Illustrated by: H.A. Rey
Copyright: 1944
Ages: 4-8
32 pages

Pretzel is a little dachshund puppy that grew very very long. He became the longest dachshund in the world. He liked being long, everyone liked him, except Greta. Pretzel was in love with Greta but Greta declared that she does not like long dogs. Pretzel started to try and prove his love to Greta and declared he would do anything for her. One day when Greta was playing she fell in a hole. The hole was too big for Greta to get out of, she was stuck. But then Pretzel appeared! He was long enough and he rescued Greta! Pretzel asked Greta again to marry him and she agreed! They were married and it was a very happy day! - JK

The Princess and the Kiss
Jennie Bishop
Warner Press
Pub. Date: July 2000
Age Range: 4 to 8

Most little girls pretend to be a princess at one point in their lives. They want the dashing prince to come into the scene, riding on a white horse, to save them from evil. “The Princess and the Kiss” is not your typical princess story. In this loved children’s book the princess’ parents give the princess the most amazing gift she could ever want. No, it was not a castle or a room full of gold. Read this book to see what this amazing gift was! - EM

Princess Justina Albertina (A Cautionary Tale)
Ellen Dee Davidson
February 2007
Ages: 5-7

When Princess Justina Albertina decides she wants a pet, her nanny runs to and fro trying to find just the right one. None of them seem to satisfy Princess Justina Albertina. And when Princess Justina Albertina doesn’t get her way, she makes a big fuss. Just as her nanny finds the perfect pet, her pet does something nobody expects! Read this book to find out what the perfect pet does and to learn about what happens to little princesses who always have to have their own way. - AM

Princesses Are Not Quitters
Kate Lum
June 2005
Ages: 4-8

Princess Allie, Princess Mellie, and Princess Libby are about to learn more about there silver palace by the sea than they ever thought. After living a pampered and boring life, the three princesses decide to be servants for ad ay. They command the servants to take the day off and let them do all the work. They soon learn how hard their servants work, but because they do not want to be called quitters, finish everything! From that day on, the princesses vow to never make their servants work so hard again! - AM

Pssst! It's ME ... the Boogeyman
Barbara Park :Illustrated by: Stephen Kroninger
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: August 1998
Age Range: 6 to 9
40pp

Pssst! It's ME ... the Boogeyman, written by Barbara Park and illustrated by Stephen Kroninger is a wonderful story for children who are afraid at night. Be it the monster in their closet, the lion under their bed, or even the boogeyman, most children have some sort of fear as they lay in bed at night. In this story the boogeyman tries to prove to a young boy that he's really not that scary. Through pointing out all of the misconceptions about himself, the boogeyman becomes a figure that in really not so scary after all. - KH

Quinito’s Neighborhood
Written by Ina Cumpiano Illustrated by José Ramírez
Pgw
Pub. Date: September 2005
Age Range: 3 to 7
24pp

Quinito brings you into his neighborhood and life as he introduces you to his family and friends. He talks about the careers of his mother and father. He also talks about other family and friends careers as he takes you through his neighborhood. This book is a bilingual selection with intriguing illustrations that incorporate Spanish words. At the end of the story there is a section entitled “words to know” that list Spanish words from the story that could be taught. The book jacket also includes illustrations and short excerpts on the author and illustrator of the book. - FT

Rapunzel
Retold and Illustrated by Paul O. Zelinsky
Copyright 2002
Ages 5-up
48 pages.

A man and a woman were going to have a child. They lived near the garden of a sorceress. The women desperately wanted the herb Rapunzel from the garden. She told her husband she would die if he did not get her some. So her husband stole her the herb. Her craving continued, and her husband again went into the garden of the sorceress. This time the sorceress caught him, and in fear of the death of his wife he made a deal to give the sorceress there child in exchange for the Rapunzel. The sorceress came and took their child and named her Rupenzel. The sorceress raised Rupenzel, and when Rupenzel turned twelve she put her in a tall tower. If the sorceress wanted to see Rupenzel, she would have her through down her long hair and the sorceress would climb up. One day a prince was riding near the tower and heard Rupenzel's beautiful voice. He could not find a door or way to reach her in the tower. He came again and saw how the sorceress made her way to Rupenzel. In the night the prince did the same. Rupenzel and the prince fell in love. He would visit her every night. The sorceress soon found out that Rupenzel was with child and left her in the wilderness to fend for herself. The sorceress tricked the prince and he fell from the tower blinded. He wandered in the same wilderness that Rupenzel was sent to. Hearing her voice he found his beloved and her tears healed his blindness. They both lived happily ever after with there children. This story has brilliant illustrations! The illustrator took ideas from the Grimms and early French and Italian sources. The characters have a realistic look with such fine details. - FT

*****

Paul O. Zelinsky' s rendition of Rapunzel is absolutely fabulous. Although it is not exactly Grace approved in one area, it is a fairly good version in comparison to someothers. The illustrations, also by Paul O. Selinsky, are stunning; they are well worth the Caldecott medal they won! The story is of a girl that is locked away in a tower, cut off from all society, by her evil step mother, who is actually a witch. There are no doors in the tower, only a window clear on the tOOth floor so the only way the witch can get to her is to use a Rapunzel's long hair as a rope. One day a prince climbs her hair and upon seeing her beauty, must marry her. The two are married and when the witch finds out, she is not happy! She tricks the prince and throws him out of the window. Rapunzel is cast deep into the forest where the prince, blinded from his fall, stumbles upon her. The two are reunited and Rapunzel heals his eyes with her tears. - KH

The Rebellion of Humans
David A. Anderson; Illustrated by Claude Joachim
1994
Ages 10 - 13

This follows the story of how humans have rebelled against Obatala, according to African tradition. There is the story of creation; the story of how humans tried to reach God; the story of how humans taught their sons and daughters to live, but the rebellion of the humans increased exponentially with each generation, and the eventual redemption thereof. - KD

The Recess Queen
Alexis O’Neill and Laura Huliska-Beith
February 2002
Ages: 4-8

Mean Jean the recess queen doesn’t let anyone do anything until she says…that is until little Katie Sue moves to town. Katie Sue doesn’t understand that Mean Jean is a bully and all the kids fear for her when she starts playing without the queen’s permission. Will Katie Sue suffer at the hands of the recess queen or will recess change forever? - AM

Remember, Grandma?
Written by Laura Langston
Illustrated by Lyndsey Gardiner
May 2004
Reading Level: 4-8 years

Margaret's grandma is very special. She wears sneakers with yellow laces and laughs very loud. They go for walks, sing songs together, and gather apples to make Grandma's special mile-high apple pie. But lately Grandma has been a little mixed up and is remembering less and less. She forgets the way home and sometimes she doesn't even know Margaret, which makes her very sad. Grandma goes away for a little while and Margaret, who was a little relieved at first, starts to miss her grandma. When she finally comes back, Margaret decides she still loves here grandma, and since she can’t remember much, Margaret will remember for her.

This is a very touching book and would be perfect for children who are dealing with grandparents who are growing older and more distant. It’s a very sweet story and will make an impression on anyone who reads it. - KW

Richard Scarry’s Please and Thank You Book
Richard Scarry
Copyright: 1973
Ages: 4-8
32 pages

Parents are always looking for ways to subtly teach their kids about manners and this book is a great way! It includes all your favorite Richard Scarry characters. This book teaches manners at home and school as well as obedience. Also, it teaches children general safety rules and how to be good citizens, friends and neighbors. It does all this in an interesting way with wonderful captions and illustrations! - JK

Rumpelstiltskin
Paul O. Zelinsky
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Pub. Date: September 1996
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

In the rendition of Rumpelstiltskin written by Paul O. Zelinsky, the story is retold in language that no child can resist. Everyone has heard the story of the girl that is forced to spin straw into gold, but what really makes this book special are the illustrations by Paul himself. The pictures are beautiful, realistic and enough to keep any child's attention throughout the book. This story teaches kids a valuable lesson about thinking before you act, and the importance of considering consequences and looking ahead. - KH

Ruthie and the (Not So) Teeny Tiny Lie
Laura Rankin
Bloomsbury USA
Pub. Date: June 2007
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Ruthie was playing on the playground one day and found a tiny little camera and she really liked it the only problem was that it was Martin’s camera. When he confronted her about taking his camera she lied and said that it was her camera. Both children went and talked to the teacher about the camera. The teacher holds it overnight and Ruthie tells the truth the next morning. Great book! - RC

The Sea King’s Daughter (A Russian Legend)
Retold by Aaron Shepond: Illustrated by Gennady Spirin
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: February 2001
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

Sadko (Sod-ko) a great musician who is invited daily to great feast in the city of Novogorod (Nov-go-rod) the Great. Even though Sadko is surrounded by beautiful maidens, many of them are rich and Sadko is poor. Until one night Sadko’s music reaches the Sea King and makes Sadko an offer that is beyond his dreams. - AP

Scoop!
John Kelly and Cathy Tincknell
January 2007
Ages: 5-8

Monty Molenski just knows he can crack the case and come up with a great news story; he’s just having a little trouble getting to it…or is he? Monty always seems to be at all the wrong places until one night when he is determined to crack the mystery of his co-workers. They secretively leave the office for the F.P. club. Nobody will tell Monty what the F.P. club is, but he’s determined to figure out. At the end of the night he’s sure that he’s failed his mission for the night, but his camera reveals that he may have uncovered the “scoop” after all. - AM

Seasons of the Trail
Lynn Glaze
September 2000
Ages: 8-12

Lucy Scott is forced to leave her Missouri home when her father decides to take the family west to California. Lucy is far from excited and dreads the treacherous terrain of the dusty trails. Things start to look up for Lucy when she meets Aaron and Seth, two handsome, blonde twins traveling with the wagon train. As the journey gets on its way, Lucy learns that the west may actually hold an adventure she could never have imagined. - AM

Seven Days of Kwanzaa
John Ward
Sterling Publishing
Pub. Date: August 2004
Age Range: 3 to 6
24pp

The Seven Days of Kwanzaa, written and illustrated by John Ward, is a great illustration of the African American holiday. Not only does it teach a little bit about the culture, but it teaches traditional songs, chants, and customs that are practiced throughout the holiday. The pictures are beautiful and vibrant. Each page represents one of the seven days of Kwanzaa. On each page it tells what the day is, what it stands for, and some of the customs for each day. This is a great way to allow kids to have a bit of an intercultural experience, and could certainly be followed with a number of fun activities. - KH

Sheila Rae the Brave
Kevin Henkes
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: April 1996
Age Range: 4 to 7
32pp

“Shelia Rae wasn’t afraid of anything. She wasn’t afraid of the dark, thunder and lightning, or monsters in the closet. However, one day while taking a shortcut home from school Sheila Rae realizes nothing is familiar and admits she is lost and afraid. Her younger sister who had been secretly following Shelia Rae comes out of hiding and tells her sister she knows exactly how get home and becomes just as brave as Shelia Rae. - AP

Sidewalk Circus
Presented by Paul Fleischman and Kevin Hawkes
Candlewick Press
Pub. Date: May 2007
Age Range: 5 to 9
32pp

The world around us can always be more then meets the eye. This wordless picture book takes an ordinary city and turns it into a “world-renowned” circus. A young girl sits on a bench and sees a “ring leader” newspaper vender, a “tight rope walking” construction worker, a pancake “juggling” cook, and many more exciting circus wonders. After the young girl catches the bus, another boy takes her sit at the “sidewalk circus”. His imagination starts to create another “world-renowned circus”. This is the first wordless picture book that I have seen. I enjoyed the idea of looking at how someone can turn the ordinary things around them into something fantastic. - FT

Silly Sally
Written and Illustrated by Audrey Wood
March 1999
Reading Level: Infants to Preschool Age

Silly Sally is on her way to town, the only problem? She’s walking backwards, upside down! Along the way she meets various animals and they decide to go along. They are making progress until she meets a sleeping sheep and they all fall asleep together. Luckily along comes Neddy Buttercup to tickle them all awake. The animals flee but Neddy joins Sally on her trip to town, walking backwards, upside down.

This book is a lot of fun to read, the cumulative story rhymes all along and keeps you guessing as to who Sally will meet next and if she’ll ever make it to her destination. - KW

Sing to the Stars
Mary Brigid Barrett; Illustrator: Sandra Speidel
Little, Brown & Company
Pub. Date: April 1994
31pp

Annotation : A young boy named Ephraim passes Mr. Washington and his dog Shiloh on the way home from violin lessons each week. Though blind, mr. Washing knows Ephraim by the rhythm of his walk which includes the brush of his violin case. Mr. Washington can tell the difference in Ephraim’s emotions and how the lesson went just by his walk. He has a keen interest in the boy’s musical gift, and encourages Ephraim to participate in the upcoming concert in the park. Ephraim tells his grandmother about the opportunity and his discussion with Mr. Washington. She informs him that Mr. Washington was a professional piano player in Harlem, who was previously known as “Flash Fingers Washington.” Flash Fingers stopped playing the piano when his daughter died and he lost his sight in a car accident. Ephraim decides that he will participate in the concert and want Flash Fingers to play with him. Initially, Mr. Washington is hesitant. However, he shows up just as Ephraim is set to play. In the brownout-induced darkness, which was not a problem for either of the musicians, the two play Amazing Grace.

Reaction : This was a very warm story, nicely written, and very well illustrated. - EH

Snow Dance
Written by Lezlie Evans
Illustrated by Cynthia Jabar
October 1997
Reading Level: 5-8 years

Two little girls are wishing for the first snow of the season, it’s in the evening forecast, so they get all dressed up in their warmest clothes and go outside to do a snow dance. The flakes finally start to fall and by bed time, the ground is covered in white. The next day, school is canceled and they head out again for an entire day of fun in the snow. Making angels, sledding, snow men and snow ball fights, there are a million possibilities. After a long, cold day, the girls head in to thaw out by the fire with warm hot cocoa, thankful for a chance to be a part of the snow dance.

This book, which is in constant rhyme and verse, is full of the joy of winter and all the fun activities a snow day can bring. It has excellent illustrations and is a lot of fun to read. - KW

Stellaluna
Janell Cannon
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: April 1993
Age Range: 4 to 8
48pp

Stellaluna, written by Janell Cannon, is the story of a bat that was separated from her mother when she is very young. Stellaluna finds herself in a birds nest with a bunch of baby chicks. The mama bird allows Stellaluna to stay if she agrees to act like a bird, not a bat Although the bat is grateful to be taken in by the bird family, she never feels like she can really fit in. When Stellaluna is big enough to fly, she is reunited with her mother, and finds that she isn't so weird after all! She had acted just as a bat should act! This story can really show kids that even if you don't fit in with some people, you should still be yourself because the real you will always fit in somewhere! Stellaluna is a classic that needs to be read by every child! - KH

Sweet Dream Pie
Audrey Wood; Illustrator: Mark Teague
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: April 1998
40pp

What do a huge pie and sweet dreams have in common? Read “Sweet Dream Pie” and find out! Ma and Pa Bridle wake before dawn and start an adventure to make a giant pie. It took till that night for the pie to finally be done and ready for Willobee Street to dig in and eat. Ma Bridle warns everyone not to eat more then one piece of this pie because it can give you bad dreams. No one listened to Ma Bridle and they all had dreams with characters that were way to excited and happy. Was Ma Bridle able to save everyone from bad dreams and help them all get a good night sleep? - EM

Sylvia Jean, Drama Queen
Written and Illustrated by Lisa Campbell Ernst
August 2005
Reading Level: 4-8 years

Sylvia Jean has an outfit for every occasion, when she goes to the dentist she’s a super hero so she won’t be scared, she acts as the Statue of Liberty to welcome new students to school, whatever she does, she’s always in costume. While at the grocery store she receives some exciting news, there is going to be a costume party! Sylvia Jean knows she will win, she just has to find the perfect costume and everyone in town is wondering what she will be. Sylvia Jean starts to worry the party is almost here and she has no idea what to where. At the party there are tons of different costumes, but no one can find Sylvia Jean, “here I am” she says, and what do you know, for the very first time Sylvia Jean is dressed…as herself! Everyone loves it and she wins the contest, the prize? A year’s worth of costumes.

This story is a lot of fun to read, Sylvia Jean has so many crazy costumes and it’s a great way to keep children involved in the story, by having them predict what she will be, I bet no one guesses correctly. - KW

Sleeping Beauty
As retold by Mmahlon F. Craft; Illustrated by Kinuko Y. Craft
2002

The classic tale of Sleeping Beauty is blended with beautiful Asian-style artwork in this new retelling. For so long, the King and Queen had wanted a child. Their wish was granted, and after little Aurora was born a celebration was held. Eleven fairies gave Aurora pleasant gifts, but the twelfth condemned her to death on her sixteenth birthday. The thirteenth fairy could not completely undo the spell of her older sister, but placed on Aurora a spell that would put her to sleep for 100 years from the day she turned sixteen. And so the story goes – until a dashing prince comes along. Many a prince had tried and failed to awaken this sleeping princess. Would there finally be a prince to awaken her? - KD

Sleepy Cadillac
Thacher Hurd
May 2005
Ages: 4-8

Imagine going on a trip to get to Dreamland. In this book, a blue Cadillac pulls up and whisks a little boy away. Filling the tank with dreams, dancing around the moon, and flying far above the world are only a few of the exciting things that happen when you take a ride in the Sleepy Cadillac. - AM

The Snowy Day
Written and Illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats
January 1996
Reading Level: Infants to Preschool Age

Peter wakes up to a snow covered world, he puts on his snowsuit and heads outside, he finds lots of things to do; tracks to make, sticks to poke trees with, snowball fights, snow men and snow angels. Peter loves the snow so much he makes a snow ball to take with him. He tells his mother about all of his adventures and as he takes a bath he thinks about the fun things he did. But when he checks his pocket, his snowball isn’t there anymore and he is sad. That night Peter dreams that all the snow is melting, the next day he calls his friend and they go play in the snow together.

This is a classic story about a little boy and his adventures in the snow, it’s easy to read and a great way to remind kids of all the fun snow is. - KW

Souperchicken
Mary Jane and Herm Auch
April 2004
Ages: 4-8

Henrietta the chicken’s aunts are going on vacation…at least that’s what they think until Henrietta comes to their rescue. Henrietta is a chicken who understands how important reading is and the sign on the truck says that her aunts are going to the chicken soup factory. Come along on Henrietta’s adventure and read the signs as she tries to rescue her poor aunts from becoming somebody’s lunch! - AM

Stranger in the Woods: A Photographic Fantasy
Written by Carl R. Sams II and Jean Stoick
Photographs by Carl R. Sams II
January 2000
Reading Level: 4-8 years

A rumor quickly spreads through out the woods, a stranger is present, but who will go see who it is. They follow the foot steps and find a snowman all bundled up. But what a surprise, his nose is a carrot for the deer, his eyes and mouth will feed the birds and the squirrels, what an odd stranger this is. If you look in the trees you will see children hiding, they built the snow man and decorated him with food so the animals would have something to eat during the winter.

Not only does this book have a very cute story and a great idea for children to try, but it has photography to act as it’s illustration. The pictures of the animals are crystal clear and an excellent way to help tell the story. - KW

Substitute Teacher Plans
Doug Johnson and illustrated by Tammy Smith
Copyright 2002
Ages 5-8

Much in need of a day off Miss Huff heads home after a long day and makes two plans one for her on her day off. Then a lesson plan for the substitute teacher. The next day Miss Huff drops off the lesson plan for the substitute teacher. However, there is a glitch! - AP

A Sweet Smell of Roses
Angela Johnson
November 2004
Ages: 5-8

This story is about a girl and her sister, Minnie. They live the house early one morning and join a crowd of people. They are some of the smallest people here, but they are ready to march. They listen to Dr. King as he speaks of freedom and then join the marchers as they march through town. The girls become part of the movement for freedom and have a great story to tell their mother when they get home and find that the sweet smell of roses they had smelled all day was just outside their window at home. - AM

The Swing
Joe Cepeda
September 2006
Ages: 4-8

Losing things is an everyday occurrence for Josey Flores. Her parents lose everything, lawnmowers, toasters, wedding dresses, Leopoldo the family dog, and even more so…time! When Josey’s dad loses time again and forgets to push her on her new swing, Josey decides to do it herself. As she flies high in the tree she finds the answers to everything that’s missing, will the swing also help her get time back with her parents? - AM

The Talking Eggs
Robert D. San Souci
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Pub. Date: September 1989
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

In this modern day Cinderella story, Blanche was the odd one out that did all the work around the house. She lived with her very cruel mother and her very stuck up sister in a small shack in the woods. While in the woods, Blanche meets a mysterious woman who invites Blanche to come to her houses. The old woman lived in a very strange place in the woods. She had multi-colored chickens and cows with two swirly horns. Before Blanche left the old woman’s house, the old woman gave Blanche magic eggs that produced gold, and fine clothing. Upon getting all these luxuries from the magic eggs, Blanche runs off to the city to start a new life without here cruel mom and stuck up sister. - EM

Tell me a Real Adoption Story
Written by Betty Jean Lifton
Illustrated by Claire A. Nivola
March 1994
Reading Level: 5-8 years

A little boy wants to hear a story before he goes to bed, an adoption story. So his mother tells him about a King and Queen who want a baby but don’t have one until a fortune teller tells them where to find one and then they are very happy. But that isn’t the story the boy wants to hear, he wants to hear a real adoption story so his mother tells him another story about a man and woman who look everywhere for a baby because they really want one, and then they find a girl who is going to have a baby, the time comes and they go to the hospital. The girl is sad but can’t take care of the baby so she cries and kisses him and tells him she will miss him and then the mommy and daddy take the baby home and he grows up to be the boy. The boy likes this story best because it is about him.

This story is a great way for children to understand adoption, not only what it means but also how both mommies and both daddies feel about the baby. It’s a very touching story that will mean a lot to both children and adults. - KW

Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born
Written by Jamie Lee Curtis
Illustrated by Laura Cornell
August 1996
Reading Level: 3-7 years

The little girl in this story again asks her parents to tell her about her birth and adoption, even though she knows the story by heart. They rush to the hospital, see her crying in the nursery and bring her home to live with them. They retell all the memories they have of her life and how special she is to them. She loves the story of her adoption because it reminds her how much her parents love her.

Curtis shows how important a loving family is in this book, with excellent illustration. This will touch anyone’s heart, especially those children who themselves are adopted. - KW

Ten Apples Up on Top
Dr. Seuss
Random House Childrens Books
Pub. Date: September 1998
Age Range: 4 to 8
24pp

How good of balance does a dog, lion, and tiger have? Find out by reading “Ten Apples Up on Top”. “Ten Apples Up on Top” is full of rhyming fun, colorful pictures and an entertaining story for kids of all ages. Children learn how to count without even realizing that they are learning through this fun story. This book is enjoyable for both the parent or teacher that is reading it and the child listening and interacting. - EM

Ten Little Dinosaurs
Pattie Schnetzler
Accord, a division of Andrews McMeel Publishing
Pub. Date: October 1996
Age Range: 6 to 10
32pp

Ten Little Dinosaurs written by Pattie Schnetzler is an adorable story that can teach kids about the different kinds of dinosaurs and what they look like. The format of the book is really interesting! Not only are the vibrant pictures by Jim Harris sure to get your attention, but there are big googley 3-D eyes that appear in each and every dinosaur in the book. This is a good learning tool for teachers to use because it teaches students about the prehistoric animals in a way that's fun and informative. - KH

There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Bat!
Lucille Colandro
Copyright 2002
Ages 4-8

A Halloween take on the poem There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Rather than swallowing a fly she swallows a bat followed by an owl and a few other creatures. Finally the old lady swallows a wizard to cast a spell get everything out . - AP

There’s Only One of ME!
Written and Illustrated by Pat Hutchins
March 2003
Reading Level: 4-6 years

There’s a birthday party today, and the family is all coming. It’s hard to keep track of who you are with such a large family. Are you your mother’s daughter or your step father’s step daughter. Your aunt’s niece or your grandmother’s grand daughter. Whatever you are to them, your family is all here to celebrate your party, and there’s only one of you!

This book is an excellent cumulative story to help children understand there place in the family. The mention of stepfathers, half brothers and stepsisters is also very relevant to our culture today. - KW

This is the Teacher
Rhonda Growler Greene; Illustrator: Mike Lester
Penguin Group (USA)
Pub. Date: July 2006
Age Range: 5 to 7
32pp

Summation: This book explains a day in a school. It has rhyme and flow to it with repeating lines. The story cumulates in the middle of the book and then starts again with cumulating lines. A teacher is ready for school when her students show up for class. The snake gets loose, the roof leaks, a kid gets sick in the hallways, and many other things happen that day. At the end of the story, the teacher goes home and falls into bed at the end of the school day.

Comments: The story is very wordy. It’s great for reading to small children, if their attention span is long enough to handle it. The pictures are very vibrant, very fun! All children can relate to a school and the things that happen during the day. This book makes a bad day funny and enjoyable for the kids to read about. - KP

This is the Van that Dad Cleaned
Written and Illustrated by Lisa Campbell Ernst
May 2005
Reading Level: 3-7 years

Dad spends all day cleaning out the van and making it shine. But soon three kids pile in and one stop at a fast food place and lots of messing around later, all of dad’s hard work has been undone. The van as well and the children are filthy, but the kids realize they did wrong and spend the rest of the day cleaning the van so it shines just as brightly as it did before.

The classic cumulative rhyme is a lot of fun and kids will enjoy the mess that is made as well as the repetition of the book. - KW

Through Moon and Stars and Night Skies
Ann Turner
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 1992
Age Range: 4 to 7
32pp

A little boy is sitting on his mama’s lap. He wants to tell her the story of how he came to her. He was living in another country when his mom and dad adopted him. He had pictures of them and the house and the dog and pictures of his room and bed. He was afraid as he made his way to his new mom and dad, afraid of the airplane, of the darkness, of all of the new things. But he knew that his new mom and dad loved him and would keep him safe. He had come home. - JH

Thunder Rose
Written by Jerdine Nolen, Illustrated by Kadir Nelson
Copyright 2003
Ages 5-8
32 pages

This story is a black folktale from the time in American history when the Civil War was coming to an end. Thunder Rose was an extraordinary child, when she was born there was a fierce thunderstorm raging. The little baby Thunder Rose took the lighting and rolled it in a ball and placed it on her shoulder. She began to speak and thanked her parents for bringing her into the world and told them she would like to be named Rose. From the beginning her parents new she going to be a strong, gifted child. Baby Thunder Rose drank her milk straight from the cow, as a child she twisted pieces of metal into different creations, by age twelve she calmed a herd of longhorn. There was an awful drought and Thunder Rose had to overcome the largest challenge of her life thus far, two tornadoes at once! With a song from deep within her heart, she calmed the clouds and brought rain to the land that had been plagued with drought. This book has excellent illustrations that exhibit the strength of the main character. I liked the way that the book gives strength and destiny to the black heroine of the story. - FT

Tiger Trouble
Author : Diane Goode
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: September 2001
40pp

Annotation : Jack and his tiger, Lily, lived in an apartment building together. The two were inseparable. Everything was fine with Jack, Lily, and the tenants of their cozy apartment building until the building was bought by Mr. Mud and his dog Fifi (both of whom hated cats). Mr. Mud wanted Lily gone by the next day. During the night, a burglar came into Mr. Mud’s apartment and tried to steal Fifi. Lily foiled the crime and saved the dog—she was a hero. Consequently, Mr. Mud, and Fifi, wanted her to stay.

Reaction : This story was not as captivating as some of the others, but it was a nice, simple read. - EH

Today I Feel Silly And Other Moods That Make Up My Day
Written by Jaime Lee Curtis
Illustrated by Laura Cornell
September 1998
Reading Level: 3-8 years

Today I feel Silly, excited, grumpy, cranky, bored. Whatever your mood this book will help you connect with what you feel and give you a way to express it. It shows that it’s ok feel the way you do, and that these moods can change very quickly.

This book has a fun rhythm, bright and bold illustrations and is a great way to help kids define their feelings. - KW

Tops & Bottoms
Janet Stevens
Copyright 1995
Ages 5-8

A very ingenious hare convinces a rather lazy bear to become business partners. Hare and his family tend to the land and crops as Bear sleeps. When harvest time comes the two split the crops 50/50 however, there is a catch. - AP

Tough Boris
Mem Fox
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 1998
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Tough Boris is a pirate that is big, tough, scruffy, greedy, fearless, and scary until his parrot dies. When his parrot dies he cries and cries. - RC

Town Mouse, Country Mouse
Written and Illustrated by Jan Brett
1994
Ages 5 - 10 

Mr. and Mrs. Town Mouse are tired of the hustle and bustle of city life. Mr. and Mrs. Country Mouse are tired of having to hunt and gather for their food all of the time. The two couples decide to trade places for a day. To their dismay, they soon find out that the grass is not always greener on the other side. They finally return to their respective sweet homes. – KD


The Traveling Musicians
Written by The Brothers Grimm; Illustrated by Hans Fischer
1944

 Four animals are distraught for various reasons, needing to flee their home and find a place to live. The dog, cat, donkey, and rooster team up to join the town band. On their way, though, they come upon a house in which robbers are eating, drinking, and having a wonderful time. The animals think they can take out the robbers, claiming the house for their own. Will they really be able to overtake the criminals? - KD

True Heart
Marissa Moss

Summation: True heart is the story of a young woman named Bee who is a train engineer. She tells the story of how she came to work for the railroad loading the cars to make enough money to feed her eight brothers and sisters. She learns how to drive by watching the engineer and asking him lots of questions. One day, the train is attacked by bandits and the engineer and coal shoveler are both injured. Bee asks to drive the train and the impatient passengers convince the station master to let her. She becomes an engineer after that day.

Comments: This tells a great story of the history of the railroad. Reading the book was like taking a step back in time. The illustrations were very vivid and made the story come alive as if they’d been photographs. I would read this book to my preschoolers and recommend it for early readers. - KP

The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by A. Wolf
Jon Scieszka
Copyright 1989
Ages 3-8

The Big Bad Wolf tells how he is totally innocent of the crimes against the three little pigs. All he wanted to was a cup of sugar to bake a cake, and the huffing and puffing was sneezing and wheezing from a cold. So that is what caused the blowing down of the pig’s houses and since the pigs were already dead what was he suppose to do?! Finally the Wolf claims that what happened was a huge dramatization by the press. - AP

Trust Me, Mom!
Angela McAllister; Illustrator: Ross Collins
Bloomsbury USA
Pub. Date: November 2005
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Annotation : Ollie was going to the store alone for the first time. His mom warned him about many things—not talking to strangers, not going through Mr. Spinelli’s yard, not putting his hands in his pockets, and counting his change. However, there were a few things that Ollie’s mother forgot to tell him. Ollie encounters many surprises along the way to the store, but as he told his mom, he is able to take care of himself. He handles each “surprise,” arrive home safely.

Reaction : This was a fun story that really reminded me a lot of some of my own adventures as a child and as a parent. I try to prepare my sons for “everything” but some things I just do not anticipate. God has a way of working all of those “unexpected” things out. - EH

Tugga-Tugga Tugboat
Written by Kevin Lewis, Illustrated by Daniel Kirk
Copyright 2006
Ages 2-5
32 pages.

This story starts out as a realistic story of a tugboat and slowly becomes a tugboat in a bathtub! The illustrations slowly include things like soap bars and a rubber ducky! After the little tugga-tugga tugboat has done its share of work, pulling cargo and putting out fires, it is put away. The little boy who has imagined all of the tugboat’s adventures is taken out of the tub and heads to bed. This story has great illustrations and great words perfect for reading aloud to young children. I like the way the other goes from realistic to imaginary. - FT

The Ugly Duckling
Written by Hans Christian Andersen; Translated by Anne Stewart; Illustrated by Monika Laimgruber
2002
Ages: 9-11

This duckling is not little and cute like his sisters. He is born big and ugly. He runs away from the duck yard, hoping to be accepted by the wild ducks. Alas, this proves to be futile. He finds a little cottage, and is rejected by the cat and the hen. He spends a long, cold winter outside in the snow. Will he ever find a place and a people among whom he is accepted? - KD

Uncle Jed's Barbershop
Margaree King Mitchell
Simon & Schuster
Pub. Date: January 1998
Age Range: 4 to 8
40pp

Segregation is a major subject concerning American History. In school every child learns about a time not so long ago when black people and white people were seen more for the color of their skin than the person that they were. Uncle Jed' s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell is a story that tells of such times. Sarah Jean, an African American little girl tells the story of her favorite uncle Jed and his dream of owning a barbershop. It tells of the trials of being a black person in the south during the great depression, and gives insight into African American history. Uncle Jed perseveres until he finally reaches his goal of having his own barbershop. It teaches kids that no matter what curveballs life throws you, if you work your hardest, the sky is your limit! - KH

The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Written and Illustrated by Eric Carle
Penguin Young Readers Group
Pub. Date: March 1994
Age Range: For infants or children in preschool
26pp

It’s amazing how much this caterpillar can eat all by himself in just one week, strawberries and plums, cheese, chocolate cake, watermelon, no wonder he has such a big stomach ache, but after a nice meal of green leaf, he feels much better. The now big, fat caterpillar builds a cocoon and climbs inside to sleep, when he finally comes back out, he’s a big, beautiful butterfly.

This story is a lot of fun to tell, it introduces lots of food, the days of the week and the process a caterpillar goes through to become a butterfly. It teaches one of natures miracles in a very simple and easy to read way. - KW

*****

Have you ever thought about how much a caterpillar can eat? In “The Very Hungry Caterpillar”, you will meet a very hungry caterpillar that seems to never get full. What will the very hungry caterpillar do to fill his little tummy? Is there a reason that this tiny caterpillar is always so hungry? “The Very Hungry Caterpillar” is a very good teaching tool on the life cycle of a caterpillar. - EM

*****

There is a tiny egg resting on a leaf. Suddenly, out of the egg comes a tiny caterpillar. He is very hungry. Over a week he eats fruit, but he is still hungry. On Saturday, he eats a lot of food and then he feels sick. On Sunday he ate a leaf and he felt better. Now the caterpillar was big and fat. He built a cocoon around himself and stayed inside for a couple of weeks. Then he chewed a hole in the cocoon and when he came out, he was a big, beautiful butterfly. - JH

The Wagon
Tony Johnston; Illustrator: James E. Ransome
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: September 1996
Age Range: 3 to 7
40pp

Summation: The Wagon tells the story of a black boy, his family, and how they reacted to life after slaves were freed. They were slaves on a cotton farm and the boy struggled with being a slave and his lack of freedom. The book tells about events in the boy’s life; he was whipped on a couple different occasions and tried to run away once. The war ends and the slaves are given their freedom. They leave the farm with the wagon they’d once built for their master. Abraham Lincoln is shot and killed and the boy says they will go to the funeral.

Comments: The story is told through the illustrations. The pictures are big and overwhelming. The abstract thoughts of the boy make the pictures seem to come alive. It’s a beautiful book. Elementary children should read this book for an understanding of how a boy their age dealt with slavery. - KP

Waiting for Wings
Written by Lois Elhert
April 2001
Reading level: 5-7 years

From little tiny eggs stuck by butterfly glue to chewing crawling caterpillars who must find a safe place to make a case to grow and change into a beautiful new butterfly. These new butterflies pump their wings and start to fly off to feed their hungry bellies. The find a flower, unroll their tongue and begin to dip and sip, then they fly back home to lay some eggs. The journey of the butterfly is now complete.

This book has beautiful illustrations, an easy rhyming text and a collage of cut pages to make it very memorable. It also has butterfly information and identification pages as well as pages on flowers and instructions to grow a butterfly garden. It would be excellent for any class studying butterflies or anyone interested in them. - KW

Wallace’s Lists
Barbara Bottner and Gerald Kruglek; Illustrator: Olaf Landstrom
Harpercollins Childrens Books
Pub. Date: June 2004
Age Range: 4 to 7
40pp

Annotation : Wallace the mouse could not do anything without his lists. One day, he meets a friend, Albert, who tries to get him to go on an adventure (Albert was very spontaneous), which does not make Wallace comfortable at all. Wallace decides, in the meantime, to make him and his friend some onion soup, so he goes to Albert’s house to borrow and onion. When he arrives at Albert’s home, there is a note on the door which says that Albert has gone to Glockanorra. Wallace new that a terrible storm was approaching and he felt the need to warn his friend. Doing so, however, would mean going on a list-free adventure and encountering all of the things that Wallace had on his list of things that he did not like. In the end, the two had a grand adventure together, and Wallace made a new list of best friends—the only one on the list was Albert.

Reaction : I really enjoyed this story and reading about how sometimes you just have to let go and meet life as it comes. This was a very well illustrated story as well. - EH

The Way I Feel
Written and Illustrated by Janan Cain
January 2000
Reading Level: 5-8 years

We all have lots of feelings, silly, bored, sad or angry. Sometimes it depends on the day or something that happens. No matter what your mood, you are very normal because everyone feels that way at some point or another. It’s ok to feel that way and it’s ok to express yourself.

I thought this was a great book full of rhyming, fun new words, and excellent colorful illustrations. It would be a great tool in helping children to understand all of the different moods they have. - KW

Summation: The story speaks in first person about feelings that a child might have during any particular day. It speaks about feeling thankful, shy, bored, scared, happy, sad, etc. There is one feeling that fills every two pages. There is an explanation of why the child is experiencing each feeling. The end of the story explains that there are many feelings a child can and will experience during a day. The emphasis is that they will come and they are a part of being yourself.

Comments: This is a good book to read to younger children and for early readers to challenge themselves with. It puts a positive light on many different feelings, and explains many difficult ones. It’s not necessarily a feel good book, but an informational one. It helps children begin to understand themselves at an early age. The pictures are very attractive. It’s a great book! - KP

We the Kids
Illustrations and forward by David Catrow
Copyright 2005
Ages 4-8

Ever think that all those big words in the Constitution were just too hard to wrap your head around. Just imagine if you were a kid! This story takes a kids point of view as to what the preamble of the Constitution looks like. Follow the dog to help you understand. - AP

What a Tantrum! (Vaya Rabieta)
By Mireille d’Allancé
Copyright 2004
32 pages

Roberto is having a bad day, his temper continues to rise and rise. His dad sends him to his room during supper. With a loud RRRRRRRHAA his temper turns into a red tantrum monster that takes over his room. The monster finishes by attacking his toy chest! Roberto can’t take it anymore. He fixes his room and puts his temper away just in time to perhaps get some dessert. I really enjoyed this story because of the way it separates the temper tantrum from the child. I think that is good book for children to see how destructive their tantrums can be. - FT

What! Cried Granny: An Almost Bedtime Story
Kate Lum; Illustrator: Adrian Johnson
Topeka Bindery
Pub. Date: December 2003

Annotation : Patrick was spending the night at his grandmother’s house for the first time. Each time she tried to send Patrick to bed, he would remind her that the things he needed in order to do what she said were not at her house (bed, pillow, blanket, and teddy bear). Each time Granny would go to make these things for Patrick. Finally, once Patrick had everything that he needed to go to bed, Grandma sent him to bed only to discover morning had arrived.

Reaction : This story was very funny. I enjoyed watching grandma go to such efforts to make Patrick comfortable, even though it frustrated her. Her love for her grandson was evident. - EH

What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?
Steve Jenkins and Robin Page
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Pub. Date: May 2008
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

“What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?” is a educational book that teaches kids about how different animals use their tails, noses and ears in different ways and fore different reasons. While making it into a game that the kids can guess what animal it is by only seeing its tail, nose, or ear. “What Do You Do With a Tail Like This?” is a great interactive book that would be fun for any elementary classroom! - EM

What Mommies Do Best/What Daddies Do Best
Laura Numeroff; Illustrated by: Lynn Munsinger
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: April 1998
Age Range: 3 to 6
40pp

Not only does Laura Numeroff write an adorable, endearing story of how parents demonstrate their love for their children, she gives you quite the deal with two stories in one! This two-fold book begins with "What Mommies Do Best", and on the flip side has "What Daddies do best". The Illustrations, by Lynn Munsinger, are beautiful! Each page shows a new animal caring for it's children. The stories begin with the different tangible ways that parents show they care, whether it be doing activities with the children, or holding them when they are sad. It concludes by saying what mommies and daddies do best is " give lots and lots of love." - KH

When I Am Old with You
Angela Johnson
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: March 1993
Age Range: 4 to 8
29ppGrandpas are always the best! In this book, the little boy tells his grandpa everything they will do when he gets old. What will be the best part, fishing, trips to the beach, storytelling? No matter what they do, it will always be great as long as Grandpa is there. - AM

When Kangaroo Goes to School
Written by Sonia Levitin; Illustrated by Jeff Seaver
Northland Publishing AZ
Pub. Date: August 2001
Age Range: 5 to 8
32pp

Kangaroo has never been to school, so she needs to get ready for what is to come. She needs to know rules there will be, what supplies she will need, what to do on the bus, and what she will learn at school. Help Kangaroo learn everything there is to learn about school in this great children’s picture book. – KD

When You Were Born
Author : Dianna Hutts Aston; Illustrator: E.B. Lewis
Candlewick Press
Pub. Date: September 2004
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp

Annotation : This book tells the story of when a child was born. It shows the hearts of the parents, grandparents, neighbors, other children, angels, and even pets and their mindset surrounding the birth and caring for the child. Everyone understands how special this new life is and does various things to welcome him/her into the world.

Reaction : This was a very simple, cute story that any young child would love (as children love to think and talk about what others did and thought when they were born). - EH

Where the Wild Things Are
Written and Illustrated by Maurice Sendak
Copyright 1988
Ages 5-8
48 pages.

This story is about a rambunctious and imaginative boy named Max. After causing mischief his mother sends him to his bedroom without supper. When Max gets to his bedroom, a forest is growing! Soon his bedroom is transformed into another world. He takes a private boat on an ocean to the place where the wild things are. He becomes their king but suddenly he realizes that being naughty all the time might not be as fun as he thought. I love this story! It is a great read aloud with all the monstrous noises Max makes and all the mischief he causes! - FT

When Mommy was Mad
Written by Lynne Jonell
Illustrated by Petra Mathers
May 2002
Reading Level: 5-8 years

When mommy burns the toast and forgets to kiss daddy goodbye, Robbie and Christopher know something is wrong. They try to figure out if it was something they might have done, but couldn’t think of any, Robbie drew a picture of a porcupine for mommy, but she forgot to smile, something had to be wrong. Robbie wanted to snuggle, but mommy looked too prickly, so Robbie was prickly too. He got very mad and ran right into mommy, he said he was a porcupine just like her and thank he didn’t like her mad. So they both cuddled up in something soft so they wouldn’t be prickly anymore, Christopher wanted to be a porcupine too, and when daddy came home prickly they knew just what to do.

Everyone gets angry sometimes, even mommies. As this book explores the frustrations of a prickly mommy and her sons, it teaches a lesson on being prickly to each other and exactly how to fix it. The illustrations are a lot of fun and look like they were drawn by the little boys which only adds to the story. - KW

*****

Two young boys notice that their mommy is upset. She is being very noisy and she did not kiss their daddy goodbye. One of the boys, Robbie, begins to get angry and goes outside to his mother. He bumps against her and says, “Bork.” She asks him what he is doing, and he says that he is “borking” her. He want to read stories and snuggle with his mom, but she is upset. Mommy smiles, and they spend time together for the rest of the day. When daddy comes home, mommy apologize for “borking” him, and the family is happy again. - JH

Where the Wild Things Are
Maurice Sendak
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: November 1988
Age Range: 5 to 8
48pp

When Max wears his wolf suit he becomes a rather mischievous little boy. Max gets into so much mischief that he is sent to his room without dinner. Then his room transforms to a forest with an ocean and a private boat, Max ends up where the wild things are. A place of terrible monsters, which Max somehow tames and then becomes king of the wild things, but soon Max becomes tired and lonely. What will Max do? - AP

While We Were Out
Ho Baek Lee
Random House
Pub. Date: March 2003
Age Range: 3 to 8
32pp

A little bunny looks through the balcony door of a house and sees that everyone has gone to Grandma’s. She pushes open the door and begins to explore the house. She looks in the refrigerator for something to eat and she sits as the table to eat. She decides to watch a movie. Then she goes through someone’s makeup and clothes. She tries to read a book, but decides to play with toys instead. She finds rollerblades and figures out how to skate using chopsticks. It is late and she falls asleep. She wakes up the next morning and knows that the family will be home soon. She hops out the balcony door and falls asleep right on the balcony. She thinks the family will never find out. - JH

Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros?
Shel Silverstein
Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
Pub. Date: July 2002
Age Range: 5 to 8
64pp

“Who wants a cheap Rhinoceros” is a simple illustrated book with few words and simple sentences. It answers the question about what it would be like to live with a rhinoceros as a pet. It shows the many pros and cons that would come with having a rhinoceros as a pet. Read a long with the simple black and white pictures and imagine how it would be if you had a pet rhinoceros. - EM

*****

In the way that only Shel Silverstein can, this creative book, however pointless, is quite entertaining! It begins by asking if anyone would like to buy his pet rhinoceros. He then procedes to list off all of the reasons someone would want to own such a pet. None of the reasons are very valid, but most of them are bound to get a laugh out of you! The illustrations, also by Shel Silverstein, are done in all black and white, giving the book a sort of "coloring book" feel. The choice of illustrations was brilliant! They really make the story what it is! There weren't really any lessons in this story, but it sure was entertaining! - KH

Whoever You Are
Mem Fox
Harcourt Children's Books
Pub. Date: September 2006
Age Range: 3 to 7
32pp

This is a beautiful book! This book combines children in other cultures to teach children no matter who you are or where you are that there are children in the world that feel the same way you do. Every child feel pain and love the same way you do. It is a great book! - RC

Why Heaven is Far Away
Julius Lester
Scholastic, Inc.
Pub. Date: October 2002
40pp

This book is a combination of African tales. It tells the story of how Heaven and Earth used to just a ladder trip away and how snakes got their defenses. In this story, Shaniqua, the angel of everybody’s business is concerned because snakes have no defense. So, she talks to God and God gives her poison to give to the snakes to defend themselves. The snakes abuse their power by biting everyone. So, God’s wife decided to help out by giving snakes different ways to defend themselves. This book is fun and full of big words; open it up to find out how Mrs. God solves the problem of the snakes. - AM

Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears
Retold by Verna Aardema; Illustrators: Leo and Diane Dillon
Penguin Young Readers Group
Pub. Date: August 1992
Age Range: 4 to 8
32pp
Awards : Caldecott

Annotation : Mosquito told iguana a tale about seeing a farmer digging up yams as big as the mosquito. Iguana did not want to hear such nonsense, so he put sticks in his ears. This started a chain of events that led to assumptions and near disaster. Iguana ignored snake because he could not hear. Snake thought iguana was plotting against him, so he went in rabbits hole. Rabbit thought snake was coming to eat her, so she fled. Crow saw rabbit and thought there was danger, so he sounded an alarm which monkey heard. Monkey went to help warn the others and, in the process, accidentally killed one of mother owl’s babies when a tree limb broke. Mom owl would not hoot to wake the sun due to her grief. King lion called a council of the animals, traced the story back to the mosquito who, to this day, buzzes in people’s ears to find out if everyone is still angry at him.

Reaction : I like the repetition in this tale, as well as the resolution in the end. Folk tales are so much fun to read. - EH

Zack's Alligator
Shirley Mozelle; Iillustrated by James Watts
HarperCollins Publishers
Pub. Date: February 1995
Age Range: 6 to 8
64pp

If you want the typical "boy and his dog" story, you won't find it here! Zack's Alligator written by Shirley Mozelle, and illustrated by James Watts, is the story of a boy who receives an alligator key chain from his uncle for his birthday. Along with the alligator is a note telling Zach that the alligator's name, Bridget, and instructing him to water her. Zack obediently waters the alligator, and to his amazement it begins to grow! Little by little the animal grows from a three inch key chain into a full sized alligator. The now full grown gator is much to big to bring into the house, so Zack decides to take her out on a walk. The boy and his alligator have many adventures together that day, but as it begins to get dark out, the alligator grows dry and begins to shrink back to the key chain size. By the time the two return home, Bridget is back to her original state, and Zack' s parents are none the wiser! - KH